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Coppice vs pollarding?

 
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Hey Mark, I’ve been eyeing your book for awhile! I already grow willow for basket making but really like plants and trees to have double duty. I want to grow something that can work in building and firewood. And if I train the willow to grow 3 ft then cut it is that automatically pollarding? My real issue is aging and still being able to do all that I want to do!
 
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Hi Betsy,

I am hoping you will hear from Mark regarding your question while the Book Promo is going strong.

I might be mistaken though it is my understanding that pollarding is done when the tree is at a height of from six to twelve feet above the ground.

So I feel that at 3 feet that would be called coppice.

I would love to see your baskets.

It is great to hear that you are growing your own trees for basket making.
 
Betsy Catanzaro
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Love the quotes!
 
Betsy Catanzaro
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Not sure if it worked but here is one!
603590E9-85C7-4503-9588-1D319261D3A9.jpeg
[Thumbnail for 603590E9-85C7-4503-9588-1D319261D3A9.jpeg]
 
Anne Miller
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Your basket is beautiful.  I wish I was that talented.

I am glad you like my quotes.
 
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Betsy Catanzaro wrote:Hey Mark, I’ve been eyeing your book for awhile! I already grow willow for basket making but really like plants and trees to have double duty. I want to grow something that can work in building and firewood. And if I train the willow to grow 3 ft then cut it is that automatically pollarding? My real issue is aging and still being able to do all that I want to do!



Hi Betsy
What beautiful craftwork you do! Thanks for sharing.

So in my mind, coppicing describes cutting a tree or shrub all the way to ground level (or within 1-3"). If you're cutting at 3' that's like a low pollard to be, but it really doesn't matter much in the end what you call it. You're stimulating new sprouts to form! I know of several basket weavers who also like to cut their willow at 30-36" high to make harvest easier on the body so you're in good company!

I'm not sure if I'm reading your question correctly? Are you asking for recommendations of species that work for building materials and firewood? Can you be more specific regarding building materials? Like what are you specifically looking for? Obvioulsly, unless it's a very long harvest rotation, you're not going to be growing lumber so if I can understand the specific context I may be able to give more detailed answers.
Thanks
Mark
 
Betsy Catanzaro
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Mark, I’ve made chairs before out of saplings but now feel quite guilty for cutting those saplings down! After reading some of the other threads I’m thinking I should go cut a nice maple down and let it do it’s thing, keeping in mind I would put said maple to very good use!! So yes I am looking for species to go to about 1” to 1 1/2” that can nailed, notched screwed and pegged. I love having my landscape be useful!
 
Mark Krawczyk
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Betsy Catanzaro wrote:Mark, I’ve made chairs before out of saplings but now feel quite guilty for cutting those saplings down! After reading some of the other threads I’m thinking I should go cut a nice maple down and let it do it’s thing, keeping in mind I would put said maple to very good use!! So yes I am looking for species to go to about 1” to 1 1/2” that can nailed, notched screwed and pegged. I love having my landscape be useful!



Hi Betsy. I'm not sure where you're located in terms of the species well suited to your climate, but it sounds like you're on the right track. Maple could definitely be a good option! And I'm a big fan of trying to work with whatever naturally grows where you live. Most of those species will also be pretty well suited to rustic furniture construction. Have fun building beautiful things!
 
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