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Looking for advice in Ireland

 
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Hello to all the friendly permies in Ireland

I am writing on my son's login, hope that's ok.

My children and I have had a smallholding in France for years where we are working towards being as self sufficient as we can.  We are thinking seriously about moving and are looking at our different options.  Ireland is very near the top of the list as it was when we first chose to come to France.  The problem is I haven't been there for many many years and it is almost impossible at the moment to take a trip to do some proper research.

We would be very grateful for any words of wisdom and practical advice about areas that would be most suitable and affordable for us to be able to carry on with our projects and develop them.  We have a long list of important requirements, obviously some more important than others such as (ideally) commutable distance  to university, plenty of trees and natural resources, sheltered but not damp and dark, friendly people and active communities etc etc

We do research online too but it is much nicer to hear from real people and hopefully make some nice contacts who are already living the same lifestyle as us.  If it looks like being a real possibility - and we can find a proper competent farmsitter - we will plan a trip to have a proper look around

Thank you so much !

(Also smallholding/small farm for sale in France if anyone looking!)

 
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Hello,  
We had a farm in Ireland for many years which we sold a few years ago to a wonderful family.   If you don’t get responses from anyone who is there now, I’d be happy to share our experiences of living and farming there.  I could also ask the family that lives there now whether they’d be willing to correspond with you.   I know how difficult it is to make such a big move without being able to get all the info you’d like to have, so can contact me at susaneldamar@live.ie if you’d like.
Susan
 
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hi, we have been running a horticultural  4 acre smallholding on the west coast  of Ireland for 33yrs .This has certainly opened ours eyes, markets,production,the elusive crops and especially weather, then and now, obviously more importantly the future. We had scorch this year on our 100yr old crab apples. A couple of years ago we came to France for a few weeks, with the same idea as yourselves, only  in reverse .If  any information from our coal face can help you please send a message and we can take it from there. Stephen
 
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the west coast and the northern parts are very wet ,try and check out the soil types in an area you might be interested in ,all of ireland has been surveyed and bore/ core samples done, take this as a warning as well,any area that has an underlying  layer of shale has been logged and charted for possible future exploitation---most of our west coast. Besides the poor drainage of bog and peatland soils, upper mountain areas and boglands are attractive to the multi national renewable energy companies and unlike the rest of europe we dont have the legal setback of 1.5km, ours is .5km---500 meters.The best way to check an area for its future development plan is each local councils planning department ,most are online with a copy of the 4 year plan reflecting their wishes and further digging around in the applications being made or granted.  its also possible to do a property price check of housing and possibly farms around the area you might be interested in that have been sold in the past. The southern part and east coast lower have our milder climate from the gulf stream ,look at places like fota island , bantry and other parts of cork ,that have planted collections of exotic plants that are growing very well, east coast is our grain growing crop region --always has the mildest temps and most sunshine for ireland .There are approximately 174000 eu directives, and we follow nearly all of them to the letter and inforce them, it can be made difficult to follow an alternative way of living or farming.
 
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