• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com pie forums private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Anne Miller
  • Pearl Sutton
  • r ranson
  • paul wheaton
stewards:
  • Leigh Tate
  • jordan barton
  • Greg Martin
master gardeners:
  • Carla Burke
  • John F Dean
  • Jay Angler
  • Nancy Reading
gardeners:
  • Beau Davidson
  • thomas rubino
  • L. Johnson

Good plants for a container, privacy hedge/fedge/medge ?

 
pollinator
Posts: 182
Location: France, 8b zone
33
2
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hello permies,

As you can see from the amount of post I'm making this week, I'm spending a bit less time in the garden.

I am planning next year to change how my terrace is organized, and it include having some private space, where there are huge plants blocking the view of part of the terrace, meaning that those plants would need to be 1.5m high ideally, and must fit in a container. Bonus point if their root are not going to dig in the terrace. Having an ashwagandha and a squash ggrow into the terrace was funny, but if I end up with trees in it, I won't laugh. So basically, a privacy hedge, edible (fedge) and/or medicinal (medge). Those terms on a search engine are just not recognized properly unfortunately.

To sum up what I'm looking for:
  • can grow in container
  • is about 1.5m tall
  • have a purpose like being edible, medicinal, entheobotanical
  • optionally have roots that will not go too deep
  • optionally if it can somewhat keep leaves in winter


  • Basically, I have a few ideas. First, having some trellis set up and having climbing plants. The ideas I have, for the climbing plants include:
  • Cucumber - edible
  • Luffas - being autonomous in sponge is one of my life goal
  • Passifolora - for its medicinal properties
  • Goji - for its yumminess/medicinal properties
  • Grape vine - becausshhh wine is shhe best thing eva
  • Akebia Kinata - heard it was nice
  • Schisandra sinensis - for its adaptogen properties


  • I have only some experience with cucumbers,  luffas and goji, so perhaps those plants wouldn't be nice in a container and for the privacy part.

    There are also a few other potential, for a hedge/fedge/medge, which are not climbing, but tall on their own:
  • Mimulus - look nice and seem to be edible
  • Solidago - powerful medicinal
  • Nandina domestica - medicinal
  • Berberis - medicinal
  • Ceanothus americanus - medicinal
  • Camelia Sinensis - seems to attract british people


  • What are your thoughts, experience ? Any other plants that could be nice ? Are there some of my ideas which should be avoided ? The smaller the container can be, the better, although I perfectly understand that a happy plant need a lot of space; some are just less needy in this area.
     
    gardener
    Posts: 1205
    Location: North Carolina zone 7
    407
    5
    hugelkultur forest garden fungi foraging ungarbage
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
      Number of slices to send:
      Optional 'thank-you' note:
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator
    Hello Mike. My first thought is hardy kiwi. It grows quite robustly here in the zone 7b of North Carolina. It’s also evergreen. You’ll need a self pollinating plant or a male and female to produce fruit.
    Jiaogulan is my second suggestion. It’s a natural sweetener with a ton of purported health benefits. I grew some for a season but a cold winter claimed it. It should be perennial where you live. Happy Gardening!
     
    Mike Lafay
    pollinator
    Posts: 182
    Location: France, 8b zone
    33
    2
    • Likes 1
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
      Number of slices to send:
      Optional 'thank-you' note:
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator
    Kiwi could be a nice one. However I tried to grow some last year, and they didn't grow much into my clayish soil. If you have any recommendation for growing it into containers I'm all ears.

    I already have a few jiaogulan growing, but I'm not sure they would make a tall enough hedge. But they could be worth a try, with some trellis.
     
    Scott Stiller
    gardener
    Posts: 1205
    Location: North Carolina zone 7
    407
    5
    hugelkultur forest garden fungi foraging ungarbage
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
      Number of slices to send:
      Optional 'thank-you' note:
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator
    The soil here is hard clay as well but it seems to be doing ok. My neighbor actually planted some in clay at the base of a rough stacked, rock retaining wall. It’s ran through the wall and helps hold it in place.
    I’ve not seen anyone grow it in pots but it may be worth a try.
     
    gardener
    Posts: 2371
    Location: Just northwest of Austin, TX
    504
    2
    cat rabbit urban cooking
    • Likes 2
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
      Number of slices to send:
      Optional 'thank-you' note:
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator
    If it's in a container is there somewhere you can move them during cold snaps?  I ask because Mandarin style oranges and certain varieties of rosemary are within your height requirements and do well in containers.  I am in an area that is still considered zone 8b and rosemary grows reliably as a landscape bush and groundcover here.

    Growing citrus in the ground requires winter protection here so it's easier in a planter. When I was in an apartment I had a Meyer lemon that produced 22 full sized lemons on a tree barely over a meter tall.  It was in a pot on the balcony whenever it wasn't freezing.

    Both those options are evergreen and produce food.  Rosemary is an early spring/late winter bloomer here which I think is a lean time for a lot of nectar dependent pollinators and has a smell that deters a lot of pest insects.
     
    Mike Lafay
    pollinator
    Posts: 182
    Location: France, 8b zone
    33
    2
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
      Number of slices to send:
      Optional 'thank-you' note:
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator
    I have far too many plants that need to come back inside, it's going to be an issue especially if it's a mini-tree. There are a few where I will try to mulch them a lot, but otherwise it's going to be too complicated.

    As for the rosemary, I already have a big one in the ground, so I'd like to try something else.
     
    Scott Stiller
    gardener
    Posts: 1205
    Location: North Carolina zone 7
    407
    5
    hugelkultur forest garden fungi foraging ungarbage
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
      Number of slices to send:
      Optional 'thank-you' note:
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator
    Hi Mike. Have you heard of pineapple sage? I didn’t know about it until last year. It may not be perfect for you because it dies to the ground in winter. During the summer it grows to about five foot tall and covered in flowers that hummingbirds really enjoy. It is a perennial in zone 7b.
     
    Mike Lafay
    pollinator
    Posts: 182
    Location: France, 8b zone
    33
    2
    • Likes 1
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
      Number of slices to send:
      Optional 'thank-you' note:
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator
    If I can mix some plants that keep some aerial parts and some that lose them in the winter in the same container, that could solve the issue. However, surprisingly, I'm not outside much in the winter on the terrace so it should not be too much of an issue. Do you know any specific purpose pineapple sage has, for humans ? I have to admit that I tend to limit plants that are purely ornamental because of space, although I can still make a few exceptions for some.
     
    Scott Stiller
    gardener
    Posts: 1205
    Location: North Carolina zone 7
    407
    5
    hugelkultur forest garden fungi foraging ungarbage
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
      Number of slices to send:
      Optional 'thank-you' note:
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator
    I’ve read it’s an excellent seasoning for chicken and good in mixed drinks. Cookout time! 😂
     
    pollinator
    Posts: 165
    91
    • Likes 2
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
      Number of slices to send:
      Optional 'thank-you' note:
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator
    I grow pole beans on a treillis for that exact purpose, with kale in the foreground. When the beans die, I hang a seasonal.wreath for fall/winter and switch to chrysentemums, then evergreen branches.

    It does the job of hiding the garbage cans and visually cutting off the garden from the parking.
    PXL_20220802_211936733.jpg
    [Thumbnail for PXL_20220802_211936733.jpg]
     
    I would challenge you to a battle of wits, but I see you are unarmed - shakespear. Unarmed tiny ad:
    The Garden Master Course - Full Video - Kickstarter
    https://permies.com/t/190216/Garden-Master-Full-Video-Kickstarter
    reply
      Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
    • New Topic