Garden Master Kickstarter
launching soon! To get the earlybird goodies, click "notify me on launch" HERE.
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com pie forums private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Anne Miller
  • Pearl Sutton
  • r ranson
  • Nicole Alderman
stewards:
  • Leigh Tate
  • paul wheaton
  • Greg Martin
master gardeners:
  • Carla Burke
  • Jay Angler
  • John F Dean
  • Nancy Reading
gardeners:
  • Beau Davidson
  • thomas rubino
  • Edward Norton

What can I expect when grinding gluten free grains?

 
gardener
Posts: 351
Location: South Carolina
191
homeschooling kids monies home care forest garden foraging medical herbs ungarbage
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I'm currently using the dry container of a Vitamix to grind grains and seeds into flour. I'm saving to buy a grain mill, but I want to know that my expectations aren't too high.

Most of my flours turn out gritty with the Vitamix, and my baked goods have a mild cornmeal-like texture. Can I expect a grain mill to produce finer flours than the Vitamix? Or am I destined to have this texture in my baked goods if I want the whole grain?

With the Vitamix, amaranth, teff, and millet seem to be the worst offenders when it comes to grittiness or a sandy texture. Buckwheat and sorghum produce a better texture for me -- more like cornmeal and less like sand. Any advice or experiences with using these particular grains for making flour and then baking with them?
 
pollinator
Posts: 1165
Location: BC Interior, Zone 6-7
368
forest garden tiny house books
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I find adding a little extra water and leaving the batter or dough for a while before cooking to let the coarser grain hydrate fully helps with final texture.

I recently got a hand crank wondermill junior. Oats and buckwheat grind up very fine. I can get them like cornstarch if I want. I haven't tried teff or amaranth, but millet is pretty good, definitely way better than cornmeal. I've had a hard time getting chickpeas as fine as I like - but I like chickpea flour very smooth, like cornstarch. Lentils are easier.

I kind of like a slightly coarser grind for most things, so after playing around with it the first day I haven't really tried for super fine. Even with a kinda cheapo mill like mine, it sounds like I get better results than you do with the vitamix, though.
 
gardener & author
Posts: 2532
Location: Tasmania
1455
3
homeschooling goat forest garden fungi foraging trees cooking food preservation pig wood heat homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I haven't milled every grain in a grain mill, but on the fine setting of my electric I get nice fine flour from everything I've tried. Oats by themselves don't go well on the fine setting, so need to be mixed with other grains, or done on a medium setting.
 
Nikki Roche
gardener
Posts: 351
Location: South Carolina
191
homeschooling kids monies home care forest garden foraging medical herbs ungarbage
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Good to know, thank you both! A grain mill has moved up higher on my wishlist. Sounds like it'll at least be better than the Vitamix.
 
Hey cool! They got a blimp! But I have a tiny ad:
Tour of Wheaton Labs, the Movie! - now available!
https://permies.com/w/tour
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic