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Biodegradable Trellis Twine Options (I'm Done with Nylon)

 
pollinator
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Over the past ten years, I have primarily used nylon cord as the trellis twine or netting as the support material for my garden trellises, but I have begun to notice a problem with nylon. It appears that nylon cord is highly vulnerable to degredation when exposed to ultraviolet light. The brand of nylon cord that I used last year had such poor resistance to UV damage that at the start of the next growing season, the cord disintegrated when tugged gently and the cord could easily be snapped in half like a toothpick releasing microplastics into the air and small, brittle nylon pieces. If this can happen in less than a year with nylon cord than it makes no sense to use it if the rope cannot be composted once the rope is too decayed to used any more.

I would like to hear some testimony about natural fiber rope materials based on how well they can last through the growing season without severely losing their strength. The material can either be commercially available (Hemp, Jute, Sisal, sinew) or only commonly available by hand-making the rope (yucca, basswood bark, milkweed bast, dogbane bast. Hopefully at least one of these natural materials can last through a growing season better than the nylon that I've been using.
 
pollinator
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Here is a jute twine net
Jute tweine Trellis-Netting-Climbing-Support-
 
pollinator
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Are you looking for rope or twine? Jute and hemp twine are pretty common. Where I live, jute will hold up for a year if left outdoors, rarely two. If you take it down and store it for the winter it can last several years though.

Here you can see examples of people making twine from many different plants :PEP make twine.

For rope, I just learned how to make rag ropes by hand (bedsheets work well).  Here is YouTube video showing technique:


 
Ryan M Miller
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Mk Neal wrote:Are you looking for rope or twine? Jute and hemp twine are pretty common. Where I live, jute will hold up for a year if left outdoors, rarely two. If you take it down and store it for the winter it can last several years though.

Here you can see examples of people making twine from many different plants :PEP make twine.

For rope, I just learned how to make rag ropes by hand (bedsheets work well).  Here is YouTube video showing technique:






Ideally, I would prefer working with two ply twine or cord since I had bad experience working in the past with single ply sisal cord that wasn't tightly spun.
 
master steward
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Have you thought about using wire?

We use the same wire that we use for the electric fence.

Found these:





source

source


source


 
master gardener
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Although I do occasionally use twine, I mostly use bamboo stakes from my own plants. They'll frequently last 4-5 years in my climate.
 
gardener
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I used branches and dollar store sisal this year.
I also use twist ties to affix the plants to the supports.
 
pollinator
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I second MK on the jute. I buy the normal jute from the hardware store and I have only had trouble once with it not lasting through the year. I generally can get a whole growing season out of it. Green beans, peas, and tomatoes. It is compostable so I don't bother trying to save it and untangle it from the plants. I just cut it down and throw the vines and twine into the compost pile in the fall, and then buy more twine the next year.

Keep in mind, most twines and ropes will have a strength rating of some sort. Holds up to 30lbs and the like. A higher rating would imply a stronger twine that should last longer. All natural fiber twines that I have seen come in different strengths, so read the labels.
 
Jay Angler
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Now's the time of year to harvest raw materials to make your own twine during the winter:
https://permies.com/wiki/105498/pep-textiles/twine-PEP-BB-textile-sand
 
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