• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com pie forums private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Anne Miller
  • Pearl Sutton
  • Leigh Tate
  • Nicole Alderman
stewards:
  • paul wheaton
  • jordan barton
  • r ranson
master gardeners:
  • Carla Burke
  • Jay Angler
  • John F Dean
  • Nancy Reading
gardeners:
  • Mike Barkley
  • thomas rubino
  • Beau Davidson

Differences in growth speed

 
Posts: 78
2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I decided to start a makeshift "kitchen garden" close to the kitchen using a spare plastic tub I was going to recycle (previously used for home brewing beer). I am not sure about plastics overall, I'd imagine I will get cancer anyway, I am not a fan of them in general, especially microplastic, but oh well.

Anyway onto the main point. I sowed these basil seeds at the same exact time, the two in the pot, and the three plants on the right of the tub. The pot was placed  roughly at the back end of the tub, so they all got about the same amount of sunlight each day, save for the 30 minutes or so where the roof slowly exposes sunlight to all plants one after the other, that is negligible. The pot got basically the same amount of sunlight as any of the three tub plants.

Why in the world are the two potted basils growing so much faster than the other three in the tub? It's the very same soil, been checking water daily and the moisture content is about the same. The tub has many holes drilled in the side for aeration.

Any ideas?
IMG_0451.JPG
[Thumbnail for IMG_0451.JPG]
 
pollinator
Posts: 1987
Location: RRV of da Nort
436
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
If the seeds and soil are the same and you feel the soil moisture is the same, then I would check soil temperature.  If you have a pair of thermometers, put one in the pot and one in the larger tub and try to monitor the temperature across as much of the day as you can.  That may be part of the difference.....worth checking.
 
Jeff Steez
Posts: 78
2
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Soil temps were the same, I used a laser thermometer since it works perfectly with black surfaces (like soil).

What about container size? Is this giant container too big for herbs? Should I size all these herbs down so their roots can hit a wall and shoot downward?

I’m quite new to growing herbs.
 
pollinator
Posts: 517
Location: Appalachian Foothills-Zone 7
108
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Jeff Steez wrote:Soil temps were the same, I used a laser thermometer since it works perfectly with black surfaces (like soil).

What about container size? Is this giant container too big for herbs? Should I size all these herbs down so their roots can hit a wall and shoot downward?

I’m quite new to growing herbs.



Surface temps might be the same but the temp 4-6 inches down will make quite a difference.  Unless your growing season is extremely short, the difference is probably negligible.  I’ve found late crops can sometimes actually evade early pests.
 
I'd appreciate it if you pronounced my name correctly. Pinhead, with a silent "H". Petite ad:
Get Paid to Build a Permaculture Paradise at Wheaton Labs!
https://permies.com/wiki/178360/permaculture-projects/Paid-Build-Permaculture-Paradise-Wheaton
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic