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Help choosing fruit trees Appalachian Mountains

 
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Hi There I'm going to start an orchard this spring. I'm in Ashe County NC and have an average last frost of May 14th zone 6a. I think I need late blooming trees because of this? The microclimate is at the bottom of a mountain forest as well.  The soil is very rich from the leaves that blow off mountain. Any experience with best fruit trees and varieties that will have the most success?  Thanks so much
Bob
 
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Location: 6.b.
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NC makes me think:

Peaches, apples, pears, apricots, Asian pears, plums, and a bunch of non tree foods.

Cherries require cold, so likely not that. Would be careful of any diseases I'm you area, such as rust blight.
 
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Location: the mountains of western nc
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i’d start with natives! pawpaws, american persimmon, serviceberry. what kind of sun exposure does the site have?
 
Bob Kalik
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Thanks for the replies. Sun exposure is different in that I'm in a valley between a mountain to the east and one to the west. Sun exposure is a few hours shorter as a result. We don't get direct sunlight until 2 hours after sunrise and lose it 2 hours before sunset.
 
greg mosser
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my situation isn’t too different - down in a valley between mountains to the NNW and SSE. while we do get some breezes up and down the valley, it’s turned out that we’re too still and damp for stone fruit of any kind - just too much fungal pressure. not sure how different your situation will be in that regard.
 
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