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Reusing hive and equipment that have wax worm contact

 
pollinator
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Last year I got my first bee swarm and they did not do well. In the late summer I discovered that the hive had wax worm and after that the bees were no more. I took all of the frames and put them into a deep freeze for a week to kill the worms. The hive body I did nothing because my deep freeze could not hold something that big. Now I am looking to trying again this year. So here are my questions:

How can I prevent wax worms from taking over a hive? Yes bee and colony are top of my mind health. Can one plant or encourage things that like to eat wax worms. Maybe a sign like "wanted critter that like to protect bees and like to eat wax worms".

Can I reuse equipment that came in contact with wax worms and if yes what do I need to do?
 
steward
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I wouldn't worry too much about it. brush out as many as is easy to do. wax moth takes over when there aren't enough bees to defend the existing comb. they don't cause the problem. in a healthy colony, they serve to cycle wax so it doesn't get too old and full of environmental toxins and cocoons.
 
T Blankinship
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tel jetson wrote:I wouldn't worry too much about it. brush out as many as is easy to do. wax moth takes over when there aren't enough bees to defend the existing comb. they don't cause the problem. in a healthy colony, they serve to cycle wax so it doesn't get too old and full of environmental toxins and cocoons.



Ok, I will do that. Thank you
 
pollinator
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Tel's answer is spot on.
 
gardener & hugelmaster
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I consider wax moths as undertakers. They aren't a problem unless something else is wrong with the colony.
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