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Tree seedling ID

 
pollinator
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I have several tree seedlings growing in my squash patch this spring. Look like they came from fruits I threw in the compost pile. I am thinking they might be osage orange or American persimmon, or pawpaw. Does any one recognize them?
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They look like citrus (like orange or lemon) to me, I guess they`d be unlikely to overwinter with you if so.
 
gardener
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looks more like persimmon than pawpaw, but i’m not as familiar with osage orange as seedlings. could you get a closer pic with the stem and leafstems in the shot?
 
May Lotito
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Here are a few more.
I will leave the seedlings there till next spring. Last year I had a handsome mango seedling in my garden and of course it didn't make through the winter.
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P1150317.JPG
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pollinator
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My money's on not osage orange. No thorns.
 
greg mosser
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does osage orange have thorns it’s first year? i know the (very thorny) honey locust i’ve grown don’t start developing thorns until their second year.

they do look like they could be persimmons. even the spots.
 
T Melville
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greg mosser wrote:does osage orange have thorns it’s first year?



I never paid that much attention. So maybe osage orange isn't ruled out yet.
 
May Lotito
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Thanks for the replies. I go for persimmon too. Recently I found a wild American persimmon tree by a road loaded with quarter size fruits. I took a leave and it did look similar, tasted similar too. If I bought the persimmon from grocery store, more likely it was variety like fuyu. Hopefully the seedlings will survive the winter in zone 6.
 
greg mosser
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a variety like fuyu frequently seedless, or nearly so. they are among the varieties (which list also includes some american persimmon selections) that fairly reliably fruit without pollination, and make a seedless fruit when doing so.
 
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