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Looking for recipe for putting up cobbler in canning jars

 
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There has to be a way to make fruit cobbler in wide mouth mason jars that is shelf stable. Google is no help. Perhaps an oven recipe? Anyone know of a way to do this? Any help appreciated, I am overrun with blueberries and peaches and was thinking how great it would be to just open a jar for dessert...
 
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I would just can the fruit part. Any topping would end up soggy. The fruit part is just like pie filling. I'm sure that there are lots of recipes for that out there. It's just like fruit, sugar, cleargel and whatever spices you would like. Personally, I usually do a crumble because I make up the topping mixture in a big batch and store it in the freezer for an easy dessert. So if you had that in the freezer and the fruit canned that seems pretty easy to me.
 
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I can't see how you'd get the grain part to can successfully.

I'd can the fruit as pie filling. If you're not in a mood for baking, you could always just drop a spoon in there, or throw some granola at it maybe.
 
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Like others have said canning might not give good results or be shelf-stable.

What might work is put filling with a crust on top then bake in the oven and when cooled put the lid on and freeze.

I have never done this so I don't know the results.

We were given some fancy apple tarts that were baked partway in muffin tins then frozen individually to be bake when we wanted a special treat. something like this might work for you.

 
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Bob Waur wrote:I am overrun with blueberries and peaches and was thinking how great it would be to just open a jar for dessert...



pretty nice problem to have. when I can't think of anything else to do with fruit, my backup plan is always make alcohol.
 
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Canning any sort of grains is not recommended by the National Center for Home Food Preservation. The reason is that water bath canning will not kill off the botulism that might be present in low-acid foods, and the pressure required to kill the botulism will not get penetrated through the grain completely. (That's the reason why we can only potato and squash cubes, not mashed puree. The pressure can't penetrate that deep into the puree.)

As noted above, I'd can just the fruit part, probably as suggested for canning said fruits in your pressure canner manual or internet search. Make sure you add a bit of acid (lemon juice, apple cider vinegar, etc.) into your recipe so the pH is low enough for boiling water canning.

Please let us know your results!
 
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Anne Miller wrote:Like others have said canning might not give good results or be shelf-stable.

What might work is put filling with a crust on top then bake in the oven and when cooled put the lid on and freeze.

I have never done this so I don't know the results.

We were given some fancy apple tarts that were baked partway in muffin tins then frozen individually to be bake when we wanted a special treat. something like this might work for you.



We always do this! We have glass loaf pans that freeze well. Any time we make a crumble, we tend to make a second or even a third for the freezer to fill up the oven. They make an easy last minute company dessert, or we bring a small one to my grandma for her freezer. We tend to thaw in the fridge or the microwave, and then if it's for company recrisp the top with 1 min under the broiler.  Those glass pyrex round dishes with plastic lids also work well.
 
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I tend to can individual items. In this case peaches. Make the cobbler later.
 
Bob Waur
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I appreciate all the responses to my question.
I avoid putting much in the freezer because I have frequent power outages, some up to two weeks, from tropical storms, hurricanes and just sorry service. Lost a whole side of organic beef one year because I couldn't get gas for the generator.
I have eaten K rations containing a canned cinnamon roll and MREs with cobbler, so I am sure there has to be a way. I just need to find the way those are done. The cobbler in the MRE was pretty good, granted, the pastry part was more like dumplings. The only references to how MREs are made say they are boiled. I don't believe that is all the facts as that would only go to 212 degrees and that definitely isn't sufficient for the items containing meat. Gotta keep looking...
 
Anne Miller
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Bob said, "I have eaten K rations containing a canned cinnamon roll and MREs with cobbler, so I am sure there has to be a way.



The canned cinnamon rolls may have been similar to the canned bread that is available.  There are probably recipes for these.  The problem is when you add fruit the baked product could become soggy or unsafe due to botulism.

I think MRE's are dehydrated so you may be onto something.  Make a cobble and then try dehydrating it.

Or maybe dehydrate the fruit, add dry ingredients with oatmeal instead of flour, seal into a mylar bag.  Presto an MRE!

 
Stacie Kim
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The K Rats are processed using an industrial sized pressure cooker that is more than a home kitchen can handle.

Same with store bought refried beans and pumpkin puree.

As others have said, I still am inclined to think canning the fruit part of the cobbler is your best method.
 
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