Help permies get a
new server
by contributing to the fundraiser
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com pie forums private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Carla Burke
  • John F Dean
  • Nancy Reading
  • r ranson
  • Jay Angler
  • Pearl Sutton
stewards:
  • Leigh Tate
  • paul wheaton
  • Nicole Alderman
master gardeners:
  • Timothy Norton
  • Christopher Weeks
gardeners:
  • Saana Jalimauchi
  • Jeremy VanGelder
  • Ulla Bisgaard

Livestock panels -> modular fencing?

 
Posts: 18
2
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Anyone here have much experience using livestock panels?  I just took down our old fence around the OG garden (100' by 100') and am considering replacing it with a combination of different fence styles.  I thought about putting proper fencing (orchard fence + wooden posts) on the North and South edges (which run parallel to the beds).  The other sides, however, I'm thinking about using 16' livestock panels hung on wooden posts spaced 16' apart.  In effect, I think this would give me a "modular" setup for the East and West fence lines, meaning I could pull them down very easily in the Spring and Fall when I'd like to get the tractor in there for bed prep.

Anyone do anything like this before??  Anything I'm not thinking of?  Ideally, I would just come up with a hanger system for the panels so they could be easily pulled off/put on.  Further, I wouldn't plan on installing proper corners for that system.. would sorta just bank on the posts holding up the panels w/o any "stretching" necessary.

Eager to hear if anyone has done anything like this and/or has any ideas or pointers.. thanks!!
 
pollinator
Posts: 261
Location: Central Virginia, Zone 7.
80
trees chicken food preservation bee solar composting
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Livestock panels might work, it depends on what you're trying to protect your garden from.

Cattle panels wouldn't work for me, as there's plenty of space for groundhogs, rabbits, and anything smaller to squeeze through.  My veg would still be toast.



 
pollinator
Posts: 549
Location: Northwest Missouri
214
forest garden fungi gear trees plumbing chicken cooking ungarbage
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I've experienced how difficult cattle panels are to move without a trailer!

With wood posts, rather than T posts, you might have some success with your easy on/off idea if you find the right size cable hanger. Essentially using J shaped hooks spaced just right so you can lift a panel and set it onto them. Wouldn't work to hold lifestock at all, but for a garden fence intended to keep critters out it would.

There are many types of cattle panels and the best one for this purpose is the type with the close spacing on the bottom couple feet and normal grid on the top. This keeps the small ground dwelling critters from just slipping through the bottom.
 
pollinator
Posts: 5207
Location: Bendigo , Australia
439
plumbing earthworks bee building homestead greening the desert
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Livestock panels are strong and costly.
As Gary asked, what are you holding back?
Why not build a proper farm fence, steel posts, wires and mesh.
Have 2 inch water pipe end strainer assemblies set in concrete and hang a gate somewhere that can be opened for the tractor>
 
Posts: 150
32
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I have done quite a bit of fencing with t-posts and cattle panels. It more cost effective than you would think, no need for braced corners, wood posts, tensioners, insulators, etcetera. All you really need is a trailer or way to get them home, t post driver, t post puller, channel locks, etc. No tractor, post hole digger, tensioner, etcetera. It really shines on uneven ground and in the woods.  Panels damaged by trees can be repaired through bending back into shape, or simply replaced. Downsides are questionable cosmetics and limited height. You can extend the height by using taller t posts and running other fence types above the panel.
 
pollinator
Posts: 241
61
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Don't know if others feel this way, but I've learned to dislike concrete wrt fencing ... digging a hole, mixing/pouring concrete into a hole and setting any kind of post is too much work, too permanent and/or too hard to remove later, if the need comes up. Depending on the design, it also seems to contribute to accelerated rotting, in combination with a wood post.

Like some of the above postings, we use t-post, welded-wire cattle panels (8' length), and just wire them up; wire being the equivalent of duct tape, around farms. For interior fences, the pounder/puller tools make quick work of putting a fence in or taking it out later.

Perhaps mesh wire across the bottom, at whatever height needed, would keep out smaller critters that the welded-wire doesn't keep out (although my LGD already does a good job of that ... if no critters, she stately walks out ... if critters, she *leaps* out and into the chase).

There's nifty methods to dress up the t-post, if it will become more permanent ... while previous landowners used the rust method to hide them, I've experimented with wood facings, gabion wire circles & rock filling, and am still thinking up and investigating other ideas (while reusing those rusty t-posts). We put something up and let it sit for a year, to see if it, or the elements, wins.

 
I don't always make ads but when I do they're tiny
We need your help - Permies server fundraiser
https://permies.com/wiki/260600/Permies-server-fundraiser
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic