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Fasting Practices

 
pollinator
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Here's a place to discuss fasting practices.

What kind of fasting do you engage in and why?

Today is Tuesday, my born day.  

I have been born day fasting for about 6 months now...

...and I spoke about Born Day Fasting in greater detail here:

  • https://allaroundgrowth.buzzsprout.com/650959/6749734-ep-59-born-day-fasting


  • Intermittent fasting is also something I've been doing for several years.

    I fast for health reasons generally, with a spiritual intent on my born day.

    It's been a bit more challenging than I expected.

    Quarterly, I also do a 72 hour water / electrolyte fast.

    What do you do?

    Why?

     
    pollinator
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    Hey Rob,


    I don't practice born day fasting, in fact I've never heard of it. It sounds neat though.

    I have been practicing intermittent fasting though for the past couple years. It started when I took a biopsychology course in university which introduced me to how hunger works. The intuitive idea is that you get hungry when your stomach is empty.  It is more complex than that though, and it's actually pretty interesting. Your body will get used to your common mealtimes, and you'll find you'll start to get hungry right around mealtime. This is not because your stomach is empty (at least not usually), it is because your digestive system is preparing for the intake of food. Eating disturbs homeostasis, and your body will try to prepare itself for the change by changing levels of insulin, glucagon and all sort of stuff in the blood and body to get ready as best it can. This leads to the feeling of hunger we all know.

    I am obviously not an expert but learning that about hunger really got me curious about eating at different times, or even not eating until I had 'real' hunger (an empty stomach). That got me into intermittent fasting and I've been doing it sporadically ever since. It's easiest for me when I'm at work or have lots to do, because I'm not focused on not eating.

    When I do fast, it's usually by skipping breakfast. I'll just have a tea and get on with my day until 1 or 2pm then have breakfast. I don't think of it as fasting but giving my digestive system a break from constant digestion, and it makes it easier to do. It also gets better reactions from friends and family when I say I'm giving my body a break versus skipping breakfast. The latter has been harped on so much that many people think it is bad for you to skip breakfast, when it's more likely to be either neutral or actually beneficial for your body.

    Edit: One of the best books I have read about not only fasting but a healthy diet is Eat Rich Live Long by Ivor Cummins. It turns a lot of the usual dietary advice on its head while having a lot of evidence supporting it.
     
    Rob Kaiser
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    Cam Haslehurst wrote:Hey Rob,


    I don't practice born day fasting, in fact I've never heard of it. It sounds neat though.

    I have been practicing intermittent fasting though for the past couple years. It started when I took a biopsychology course in university which introduced me to how hunger works. The intuitive idea is that you get hungry when your stomach is empty.  It is more complex than that though, and it's actually pretty interesting. Your body will get used to your common mealtimes, and you'll find you'll start to get hungry right around mealtime. This is not because your stomach is empty (at least not usually), it is because your digestive system is preparing for the intake of food. Eating disturbs homeostasis, and your body will try to prepare itself for the change by changing levels of insulin, glucagon and all sort of stuff in the blood and body to get ready as best it can. This leads to the feeling of hunger we all know.

    I am obviously not an expert but learning that about hunger really got me curious about eating at different times, or even not eating until I had 'real' hunger (an empty stomach). That got me into intermittent fasting and I've been doing it sporadically ever since. It's easiest for me when I'm at work or have lots to do, because I'm not focused on not eating.

    When I do fast, it's usually by skipping breakfast. I'll just have a tea and get on with my day until 1 or 2pm then have breakfast. I don't think of it as fasting but giving my digestive system a break from constant digestion, and it makes it easier to do. It also gets better reactions from friends and family when I say I'm giving my body a break versus skipping breakfast. The latter has been harped on so much that many people think it is bad for you to skip breakfast, when it's more likely to be either neutral or actually beneficial for your body.

    Edit: One of the best books I have read about not only fasting but a healthy diet is Eat Rich Live Long by Ivor Cummins. It turns a lot of the usual dietary advice on its head while having a lot of evidence supporting it.



    Hi Cam, thanks for sharing your history and experience with fasting.  My intentional fasting began with the health aspect in mind, and born day fasting just adds another element to the fasting I do.

    I’ll have to check out the book you referenced.  One of the best series of books that I read that changed my thoughts on food was “The Grain Brain” and other books in the series by Dr. David Perlmutter.  He writes about food and it’s effect on Alzheimer’s - but since I struggle with epilepsy, I figured following the dietary protocol outlined there would be a great place to start regarding my diet.

    I’ve much to learn still on fasting and the overall benefit of it - looking forward to learning more!  🙂
     
    pollinator
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    I'm on week 2 of keto, low sodium, dairy-free, refined sugar-free with a 16-hour fast where I eat my first meal at 2pm and my 2nd at 6pm and a heavy workout in the morning.

    (pretty much cold turkey cut out anything processed)

    It's hard getting healthy when the rest of my family is still addicted to junk foods. The brownies call to me but I have to ignore them.

    The health benefits were noticeable the first week.
     
    Rob Kaiser
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    T Simpson wrote:I'm on week 2 of keto, low sodium, dairy-free, refined sugar-free with a 16-hour fast where I eat my first meal at 2pm and my 2nd at 6pm and a heavy workout in the morning.

    (pretty much cold turkey cut out anything processed)

    It's hard getting healthy when the rest of my family is still addicted to junk foods. The brownies call to me but I have to ignore them.

    The health benefits were noticeable the first week.



    That’s great that you’re sticking with it!  The first few weeks of a dietary change are the hardest for me.  Definitely is more challenging when there is junk food available and still being eaten by others.

    Hang in there - I initially cut out dairy myself, but occasionally will have some locally made cheeses or some Greek style yogurt and what not.  It’s no where near the amount I used to consume, and I think that’s worked well for me!  I am willing to try dairy again when I have a steady source of raw milk.
     
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    Hi Rob,

    It's currently Ramadan, so we are fasting for this whole moon cycle. We wake up before sunrise, have a bit to eat and hydrate, then fast from sunrise to sunset. I've come to really like this because it being my fuel for the day I am way more aware of what I eat and how it will affect my body. When I treat myself well in the morning, the day is a breeze, and when I don't - it's a struggle. There is a initial gut reaction to just eat as much as you can in the morning, yet everyday I learn more of what my body currently needs/wants. Throughout the day fasting from food and water really helps me check in with my daily habits. I've noticed this year how often I grab at food when I need to feel grounded, when sitting on the ground or pausing for a moment actually grounds me more. And also how much spiritual practice can actually give me energy! We break fast at sunset with a date and drink, then eat before settling in for the even. Finding how much less I need to consume overall.

    I have been trying to find the individual days I will fast over the next year as a check-in. Was thinking full moon days, but the idea of a born day sounds like an appealing practice - I am going to look more into it.
     
    Cam Haslehurst
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    Rob Kaiser wrote:

    Cam Haslehurst wrote:Hey Rob,


    I don't practice born day fasting, in fact I've never heard of it. It sounds neat though.

    I have been practicing intermittent fasting though for the past couple years. It started when I took a biopsychology course in university which introduced me to how hunger works. The intuitive idea is that you get hungry when your stomach is empty.  It is more complex than that though, and it's actually pretty interesting. Your body will get used to your common mealtimes, and you'll find you'll start to get hungry right around mealtime. This is not because your stomach is empty (at least not usually), it is because your digestive system is preparing for the intake of food. Eating disturbs homeostasis, and your body will try to prepare itself for the change by changing levels of insulin, glucagon and all sort of stuff in the blood and body to get ready as best it can. This leads to the feeling of hunger we all know.

    I am obviously not an expert but learning that about hunger really got me curious about eating at different times, or even not eating until I had 'real' hunger (an empty stomach). That got me into intermittent fasting and I've been doing it sporadically ever since. It's easiest for me when I'm at work or have lots to do, because I'm not focused on not eating.

    When I do fast, it's usually by skipping breakfast. I'll just have a tea and get on with my day until 1 or 2pm then have breakfast. I don't think of it as fasting but giving my digestive system a break from constant digestion, and it makes it easier to do. It also gets better reactions from friends and family when I say I'm giving my body a break versus skipping breakfast. The latter has been harped on so much that many people think it is bad for you to skip breakfast, when it's more likely to be either neutral or actually beneficial for your body.

    Edit: One of the best books I have read about not only fasting but a healthy diet is Eat Rich Live Long by Ivor Cummins. It turns a lot of the usual dietary advice on its head while having a lot of evidence supporting it.



    Hi Cam, thanks for sharing your history and experience with fasting.  My intentional fasting began with the health aspect in mind, and born day fasting just adds another element to the fasting I do.

    I’ll have to check out the book you referenced.  One of the best series of books that I read that changed my thoughts on food was “The Grain Brain” and other books in the series by Dr. David Perlmutter.  He writes about food and it’s effect on Alzheimer’s - but since I struggle with epilepsy, I figured following the dietary protocol outlined there would be a great place to start regarding my diet.

    I’ve much to learn still on fasting and the overall benefit of it - looking forward to learning more!  🙂



    Thanks for the recommendations. It's interesting you mentioned Alzheimers, because my dad is reading through Eat Rich Live Long right now and he was telling me about a part describing how insulin resistance contributes to all sorts of chronic disease, including Alzheimer's. It has been a bit of mystery disease as far as causes go but it looks like we are getting closer to figuring it out!
     
    gardener
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    May I add another book recommendation: The Complete Guide to Fasting Dr. Jason Fung. Interesting read and good food for thought in there.

    He has other books, also very interesting, and quite an online following of people.
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