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Grind Azomite dust in spice grinder?

 
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I heard it takes a year or two for the soil to break down the azomite to get use out of it.  What if I used a spice grinder on it.. get it into a fine powder (which I will be careful not to breathe).
 
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what size particles are they now?
the bag i bought is unbelievably fine to begin with
i use it in pots for annuals and it seems to make a difference
i think it should be ok as is
a little goes a long way.. i give each plant a half a teaspoon
 
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Location: St. George, UT. Zone 8a Dry/arid. 8" of rain in a good year.
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It comes in two forms, powdered, and pellet form.   I live in Utah (where it's mined), and I've only ever seen the pellet version for sale here.  I'd prefer the powdered, but I would guess the pellet form wouldn't take too much longer to break down compared to the powdered.

I'd guess your grinder would be ruined in a short amount of time.  Maybe a hammer and a couple of ziplock bags might be better if it's just a small amount you wanted to crush.

I throw it in my compost pile and feed some to my chickens.  I don't put it directly on my garden beds anymore.  By the time the compost goes to the garden, I figure it's been broken down to a usable point.

Have fun (wear glasses, if you try crushing it).

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