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need help ID'ing this thorny "vine"

 
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I guess I'm not using the right search terms, because I cannot find this thing on the internet. I'm calling it a vine, but it's actually a woody "shrub" that sends out long branches with thorns that grab onto nearby trees to use them to climb up. The first pic is a closeup I took yesterday. You can see it's berrying. In that pic, the vining plant is a honeysuckle, but on the branch you can see one of the thorns. In the second photo, is the same plant that used one of our pecan trees as a trellis. We cut it down several years ago but it grew back.

The flowers are small and inconspicuous but smell sweet. The berries are soft, not smooth, and the chickens like them.

Any ideas?
mystery-berry.JPG
Closeup of the leaves, berries, and a thorn.
Closeup of the leaves, berries, and a thorn.
mystery-plant.JPG
This one is taking over a pecan tree.
This one is taking over a pecan tree.
 
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your photos reminded me of Ratan vine.  https://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/showimage/121374/

It has a small thorn though and the leaves pictured in this link don't look quite like yours?

We had a lot of it at our old place and I always wanted to make something out of it as the vines would twine together in such beautiful ways.
 
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Thorny silverberry or something related? Apparently they can climb.

https://landscapeplants.oregonstate.edu/plants/elaeagnus-pungens
 
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When I visited my grandparents in the summer, they had a vine that looked like that.  If I remember correctly it was a Barberry Vine.
 
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I agree with Jennifer, the berries look like elaeagnus to me with the little speckles so pretty. Maybe E. Angustifolia (Russian olive) edible wild food has some nice pictures.
 
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yep, definitely an eleagnus of some sort. the berries should be edible!
 
Leigh Tate
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Thank you, All! I followed your leads and believe it is Elaeagnus pungens, aka Thorny Olive or Silverthorn. It's sold as an ornamental, but listed as a non-native invasive that can be quite problematic. I understand why! Greg, I didn't see anything about edibility, but I think it's hopefully eradicated now. So many other useful things to grow!
 
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