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Making a shoulder bag from paper

 
r ranson
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What a great idea!

 
Tonya Hunte
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Any ideas about what her odd paste is made out of?
 
r ranson
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I think we need someone who can read Chinese to figure it out,

But it might be a flour-based paste with a drop of linseed oil.  They used to use that in Victorian England to make paper mache furniture.  
 
Tonya Hunte
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r ranson wrote:I think we need someone who can read Chinese to figure it out,

But it might be a flour-based paste with a drop of linseed oil.  They used to use that in Victorian England to make paper mache furniture.  



Very neat!! Even if that isn't how this person makes it, I think that's a great little tidbit that could help someone try something like this
 
r ranson
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I've seen something like this for sale in the local shops a couple of years ago.  They called it "paper leather".  I wonder if they made it the same way.
 
Tonya Hunte
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r ranson wrote:I've seen something like this for sale in the local shops a couple of years ago.  They called it "paper leather".  I wonder if they made it the same way.



Now that you say that, I've also seen mushroom leather, and I wonder if that and this are anything alike!
 
Tereza Okava
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100 g 硅 胶 (silica gel)
300 g 周化剂 (or maybe 固化剂)- some kind of solidifying or curing agent. Google and Ali Baba indicate it might be some sort of epoxy resin.*

*This is my guess only as a person who can read enough Chinese to look things up in a dictionary, not actual advice.
 
Chris Kott
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Mushroom leather, the stuff Paul Stamets' hat is made of, anyway, is actually a single, specific type of fungal fruiting body. It is unrolled from its grown form, but beyond that, I don't know what processing is required, but probably drying and curing of some sort.

-CK
 
May Lotito
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The white paste looks like PVAC,  Polyvinyl acetate emulsion to me. 白乳胶
 
Jay Angler
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I gave up wearing a purse decades ago - but... Japanese kids where a specific traditional backpack to school. Most of our North American backpacks are made from artificial fabrics, but I wonder if this technique could be used instead of leather? (Leather's great, but hard to get quality, local leather here and I'm not up to processing deer any time soon - it wouldn't be thick enough without using multiple layers either)

It seems to me that this shape of pack might lend itself to the "cardboard purse" concept fairly well, and would be practical for carrying stuff around a property or a bit of shopping.
For my climate, we'd need some moisture protection on the top cover, and some sort of little feet like the video showed, but they could be made of wood easily enough.
 
r ranson
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This video has some English words with the different white pastes she's adding.  

But the techniques look more and more like old Victorian Papermachet, but with modern ingredients.  I wonder if we can find home-grown alternatives to the chemicals.  

Also, Nicole has some great experience with building from paper.  
 
r ranson
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it would probably be helpful if I put the video in the post.  silly bird.

 
Simon Foley
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If it literally is a paper paste how waterproof is the final item?
 
Carla Burke
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It would need something like a beeswax or shellac coating, for water resistance, but would either of those work with a paper based medium? How flexible is shellac?
 
r ranson
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Simon Foley wrote:If it literally is a paper paste how waterproof is the final item?



Victorians used to make waterproof paper mache roof tiles.   It rains a bit in England.  
 
r ranson
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One way Victorians waterproofed their paper mache was with linseed oil.  They applied a thin coat, cured in a 'warm oven' (I don't know how hot it was but I suspect not very) for 24 hours, then applied another coat... blabla until it was ready.  

They made furniture, housing (roof tiles), bowls, and all sorts of things from paper mache.  It was the 'plastic' of their age.
 
Daisie Magrob
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You made this bag just for yourself or you sell those, please let me know where I can buy those hand-made bags.
 
Leigh Tate
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Truly amazing. I just scrolled through all the video comments in hopes that the ingredient information would be there. Quite a few people asked the question, but so far, no answer.
 
Kim Huse
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Tonya Hunte wrote:Any ideas about what her odd paste is made out of?



To me, it looks like White PVA glue; I have been a handcrafter  ever since  my momma started me when I was little; if its anything else, sure would like to know'
 
Kim Huse
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r ranson wrote:What a great idea!

Am I the only one who wants the large mortar and pestle she uses?
 
Jay Angler
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Kim Huse wrote:Am I the only one who wants the large mortar and pestle she uses?

Absolutely not! I have no idea where in Canada I could get such a thing. And I'd hate to think what it would cost if I did!
 
Carla Burke
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Jay Angler wrote:

Kim Huse wrote:Am I the only one who wants the large mortar and pestle she uses?

Absolutely not! I have no idea where in Canada I could get such a thing. And I'd hate to think what it would cost if I did!



Yup - one could do much, with an m&p, like that!
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