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Plant ID

 
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Hello, hope I’m posting this in the right place.

I was clearing out a neglected part of my garden today and pulled this little thing out.  I can’t seem to identify it.  Anyone know what it is?



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pollinator
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Likely some kind of flower, tuberous or bulbous, spring bloomer. Possibly something in the hyacinth family? Does it have a bulb, or a tuber? It's definitely something perennial. Might help if you mention what area you're in.
 
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I suspect a hyacinth as well. (And on a side note, I'm kinda jealous of your beautiful, dark soil!)
 
pollinator
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is it connected to the dead stems that are next to it? that looks like a shoot from a perennial that gets way bigger than a hyacinth to me.
 
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Looks a bit like some Epilobium species...
 
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Certainly not hyacinth.
Either epilobium, or lysimachia (my guess, I have both in my garden).
 
Jodi Smith
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Lauren Ritz wrote:Likely some kind of flower, tuberous or bulbous, spring bloomer. Possibly something in the hyacinth family? Does it have a bulb, or a tuber? It's definitely something perennial. Might help if you mention what area you're in.



Thanks folks. Apologies I should have said I’m in North East Scotland.

I was really just curious more than anything.  I’m used to growing veg but flowers not so much.  I’ve replanted to wait and see what comes of it.  It was not deep rooted at all and I didn’t even notice it while I was weeding until it was in my hand.

 
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It couldn't be Hablitzia could it?  My other guess would be Willowherb!
 
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Resembles the horrid knotweed (polygonum cuspidatum) we have here in Pennsylvania (northeastern United States). Grows inches daily. Huge rhizome stores loads of energy making it difficult to eradicate. I hope for your sake it's not that dreaded monster. I don't know your plant zone, but I believe it's caused immeasurable damage to older structures in England.
 
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