• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com pie forums private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • Anne Miller
  • Mike Haasl
  • Pearl Sutton
  • paul wheaton
stewards:
  • r ranson
  • Burra Maluca
  • Joseph Lofthouse
master gardeners:
  • jordan barton
  • Leigh Tate
  • Carla Burke
gardeners:
  • Greg Martin
  • Jay Angler
  • John F Dean

Treeline for Water Mitigation?

 
Posts: 1
Location: Southern New England, United States
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hello Permies,

I was hoping for some help brainstorming-troubleshooting something my community garden has been dealing with.

About half of our community garden is very wet in the spring.  Of course raised beds help, plus we maintain the aisles between garden plots with grass.  FYI the soil is fine sandy loam, USDA prime farmland.  We're right on the border of zone 6 and 7.  Although the soil is sandy, it becomes like concrete if you work it or walk on it when wet.  Just to give you a sense, some years we can't rototill until almost June (for plots that need it, we encourage no-till).  

We share a field with a farmer -- I believe a lot of the water is coming from his part of the field (where we sometimes see standing water in the spring), which we are downhill from.  We are considering using a swale to catch and divert the water at our border.  But we don't have much space for water diversion and storage (plus, we really don't need the water for anything).  So I'm wondering if we could partially mitigate the issue by planting a treeline.  (I've heard of willow being used for this purpose.)  Preferably this would be trees that won't grow taller than 20 feet or so.  This treeline would be  WNW of garden plots, so there is some concern about shade (we want to be able to develop new plots as close to our property line as possible).

Even partial mitigation would be a big help (say drying out the soil week earlier).  Does this sound like a reasonable approach?  Any thoughts or suggestions (particularly on what to plant)?
 
pollinator
Posts: 364
Location: East tn
92
hugelkultur foraging homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
A treeline could help sink the water. Id suggest a crescent shaped swale yo slow it down. Then maybe plant rose of sharon hibiscus (edible flowers/young leaves) and/or elderberry (jelly/juice) on the downhill side.
 
pollinator
Posts: 1808
Location: Bendigo , Australia
118
dog gear plumbing earthworks bee building homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Is there a water course any water can be sent down?
The Dutch pumped ground water away with windmills, it is possible at the property?

If you do the research you will find a number of trees that will transpire water, but it takes years.
What area of land and what volume of water are we looking at?

In the early days drains were created in low lying areas by pulling 'moles' through the ground and discharging them to drains built for the purpose.

A combination of these idaes will work, but they have a cost to complete.
 
They worship nothing. They say it's because nothing is worth fighting for. Like this tiny ad:
advertising for free (and not-free) on permies.com
https://permies.com/wiki/27826/advertising-free-free-permies
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic