Win a copy of The Edible Ecosystem Solution this week in the Forest Garden forum!
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Anne Miller
  • Pearl Sutton
  • r ranson
  • Nicole Alderman
  • Mike Haasl
stewards:
  • paul wheaton
  • Joseph Lofthouse
  • James Freyr
master gardeners:
  • Carla Burke
  • John F Dean
  • jordan barton
gardeners:
  • Jay Angler
  • Greg Martin
  • Leigh Tate

Seaberry

 
pollinator
Posts: 1165
Location: Nevada, Mo 64772
101
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Only one of my seaberries survived. I don’t know if it’s male or female. Will it be hard to tell when the shrub blooms? I have never seen a seaberry bloom.
I don’t want to buy one of each and end up with two males and one female

I guess they don’t self pollinate at all?
 
pollinator
Posts: 386
Location: the mountains of western nc
91
forest garden trees foraging chicken food preservation cooking wood heat homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
it shouldn’t be too hard to tell when it’s blooming. just do a google image search for the difference.
 
pollinator
Posts: 1543
Location: Denmark 57N
427
fungi foraging trees cooking food preservation
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Do they grow wild where you are? If so and you are lucky enough to have a female just go and grab a cutting from one now that doesn't have berries on, they root easily. No they can't self pollinate and they are not very easy to tell apart even when flowering, their flowers are pretty pathetic, I did find a paper on how to tell from the buds here that doesn't look to easy either!
 
pollinator
Posts: 331
Location: Zone 8b Portland
46
forest garden fungi food preservation
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
This video helped me identify mine: https://youtu.be/yelTD0VJh5I
 
greg mosser
pollinator
Posts: 386
Location: the mountains of western nc
91
forest garden trees foraging chicken food preservation cooking wood heat homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
maybe it’s my years of botany classes, but the flowerbuds look very different to me, shapewise.
 
pollinator
Posts: 301
Location: Worcestershire, England
64
hugelkultur purity forest garden fungi trees urban bike bee woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Is it a named cultivar or not? Personally I wouldnt bother growing the normal version as the fruits are small almost inedible and are difficult to remove from the plant. I leave my normal ones for the birds but they dont even seem to eat many of them, so I will take them out eventually and replace them with the cultivated suckers.

If its a  named cultivar it can tell you if its male or female.
gift
 
Companion Planting Guide by World Permaculture Association
will be released to subscribers in: soon!
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic