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Natural remedies for poison ivy/poison oak/poison sumac etc?

 
gardener
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What are the best natural remedies for remedies for poison ivy/poison oak/poison sumac etc?
 
pollinator
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I’m not susceptible to the evil that is poison ivy/oak. I do have ms and my flair ups cause all old skin irritations to get angry at once. Eczema, bugs bites or dry skin; they’re all the same.
Marshmallow root is the most soothing thing that can be rubbed on my skin. It instantly feels better! Dandelion root isn’t instant relief but it seems to help everything heal faster.
 
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Thank you, Scott! I'll keep that in mind!

It's not a natural remedy, but I use an abrasive sponge and dish soap in the shower if I come into contact with poison ivy. It's an oil that must be thoroughly washed off within the first couple hours or it will absorb into the skin and spread.

I'm also wondering if comfrey might help. Or maybe plantain?
 
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wash with a strong soap like sunlight bar soap or liquid dish soap ... the sooner after exposure the better
then apply "spotted touch me not" juice

i get poison ivy bad... pretty much every year
as a kid when i got it bad i would go to the walk in clinic and they would prescribe a prednisone cream or if was really bad oral prednisone
well one day i reached a breaking point dealing with poison ivy on my groin on a holiday so it meant a trip to the hospital
they (while being paid all the while) made me tell my story to 4 or 5 different people  separately and i am sure they were all laughing about it
i was then put in a room with 40 people all in need of medical attention more than me
its canada so those in the worst shape get priority
so i left and had to figure something out myself

i find if it is all over you.. you need to shower many times per day with strong soap for about a week
the itching is so bad you will want to scratch it right off to the point of bleeding and scalding hot water feels "good"

i did find out that the plant "spotted touch me not" which tends to grow near poison ivy..
can help to stop the allergic reaction.. especially if applied as soon as possible after exposure (wash with detergent soap too)

i will warn however that when i used this on my forehead i did have some persistent bumps for about a year afterwards so i recommend not using it on youre face
it seems to me (complete subjecture here) the oils which youre body has encapsulated (ie rash) can then re emerge as the skin is worn down naturally and you may get a small rash
(which does not spread) without subsequent exposure
just my guess as to what is happening

also be sure to wash clothing that you were wearing and put it directly in the wash as not to spread the oils

either way i will still use the juice from the crushed stems of the spotted touch me not and first wash thoroughly with a strong soap
no wages earned or drugs sold.. and problem solved ... without ridicule
 
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Aloe vera applied to it works for me.
 
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I have only had a reaction to poison ivy once in my life and I don't remember what I used to clear it up. The only thing that comes to mind is apple cider vinegar.

I have read a lot here at permies about jewelweed.  It is not something that grows here where I live.

Here is a mention about making a salve that uses jewelweed:

https://permies.com/t/15264/Growing-Jewelweed#136257
 
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I eat the little red leaves when they appear in the spring.

"Once a Day in the Month of May" I think is the saying.


 
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Back when I lived in the US, I'd get poison ivy about once a year. I usually got it on my face, because I like washing my hands with soap several times a day, but I don't use soap on my face. After I know I'm exposed, I change and wash my clothes, and use soap -- any kind, but thoroughly. And that has always prevented the rash when I knew I had been exposed. And doing a pretty detailed thinking about "contact tracing" (as we'd call it in 2020) and washing any items that might be carrying the urushiol oil. Unwitting exposure usually caused much smaller cases. By the way, it really doesn't require specially strong soap or detergent, but it does have to be a real soap or detergent, any common kind that cuts oils.

Washing with soap works so well that I am willing to yank up a poison ivy seedling with a bare hand, if I know I can then go directly to a sink with my hand held away from the rest of me.
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