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Mushroom ID Please (They are growing out of the floor)

 
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Hi all,

today i visited a potential homestead, the house has not been attended to since 1990, so nature started taking it back.

The parquet floor and some beams that fell from the ceiling (don't worry they were ornamental, not structural) started
growing mushrooms.

I will probably not buy the site, but if the mushrooms prove to be edible i would happily take the colonized lumber to another site.


IMG_20201029_130745.jpg
unidentified mushrooms
unidentified mushrooms
IMG_20201029_130755.jpg
unidentified mushrooms
unidentified mushrooms
IMG_20201029_130803.jpg
unidentified mushrooms
unidentified mushrooms
 
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Location: West Virginia
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I'm no expert, but I'm learning a lot these days about mushrooms. I'd venture to guess that this is Paxillus. To my knowledge, these are all (or mostly all) toxic.
 
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How about these?  I noticed them today.  Weird looking, but sort of neat, too.
mushroom-01.jpg
[Thumbnail for mushroom-01.jpg]
mushroom-02.jpg
[Thumbnail for mushroom-02.jpg]
 
Julie Harris
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Wondering if this is it?
https://www.mushroomexpert.com/polyporus_badius.html

(Boosting because I have no idea what to do about these growing in my yard.  Any amateur mycologist available?)
 
pollinator
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Location: Gulf Islands BC (zone 8)
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I'm not an expert either but I wondered if the yellow ones that R Han posted might be golden chanterelles? In which case they would be edible.

For both of the ID questions, is there a mycology club in your area? Local knowledge is invaluable when it comes to mushrooms. Lots of lookalikes out there so getting advice from someone who knows what species are found in your area is really necessary. Club members will know that sort of thing and often are keen to share that knowledge as long as you don't expect them to show you all their secret shrooming spots. Another option if you have a university nearby is to look in the botany department, I had a prof in university who was willing to help people identify shrooms. The payback for him was that it increased his understanding of local biodiversity and distribution.  
 
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Time of year suggests false chanterelles. Toxic. True gills.
 
Julie Harris
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Thank you so much.  Will look into those further.  I'm too timid to eat mushrooms in the wild, but my concern is the dogs in the area.
 
Andrea Locke
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Tj, as I said, not an expert.  I looked up the difference between chanterelles and false chanterelles and I think you're right.

https://practicalselfreliance.com/chanterelle-mushrooms/

Where I am in BC it is presently chanterelle season.

When it comes to foraging my own shrooms I have about four species I am absolutely certain of, and stick to those unless I'm with someone more expert. Chanterelles aren't one of them.

 
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Not sure about the top ones 100% sure they're not chanterelles. They don't look too much like Jack o Lanterns either. The clumping ones could be "ringless honey fungus." You'd have to get some specimen samples from when they're in their prime to confirm. If ringless honeys, you couldn't transport and likely wouldn't want to as they infect large areas and kill hardwoods.
 
Andrea Locke
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Adam, I think Tj is right about them being false chanterelles (not Jack O'Lantern). If you go to that link I included in my post above, and keep going past the Jack O'Lantern, it is the last mushroom discussed in the link.

 
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I think I would be concerned with what they are growing on as well as identifying the fungi...house lumber is likely to have toxins in the finishes at the very least and some mushrooms are known for their mycoremediation abilities...where they themselves can pick up toxins from the substrata.

Remediation through fungi is also called as mycoremediation. Mycoremediation tool refers to mushrooms and their enzymes due to having ability to degrade a wide variety of environmentally persistent pollutants, transform industrial and agro-industrial wastes into products.


https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4052754/

Interesting find though...and looks like they are well on their way to breaking down that wood
 
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