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Buckles, Betties, Cobblers and Crisps

 
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When I cook something with fruit, I usually call it a cobbler.  Though some might call their's a buckle, a bettie, or a crisp.

My cobblers are usually a peach cobbler though I like blackberry, fig, or what ever fruit I have.

So which will it be? A Buckles, Betties, Cobblers, or Crisps?

What do you call yours?  What is your favorite kind?  What kind of fruit do you like?


This is a Buckle according to the website:

An old-fashioned buckle features a cake on the bottom with fruit piled on top and, as the name suggests, it buckles when it bakes. In our summertime version, we combine two favorite stone fruits—cherries and plums—to create a dessert that will be a hit at backyard barbecues and other gatherings. To gild the lily, add a dollop of whipped cream enriched with crème fraîche.



https://blog.williams-sonoma.com/stone-fruit-buckle-creme-fraiche-whipped-cream/



Source


This is a bettie according to the website:

Brown betty, named, apparently, after the person who invented it, is usually made with apples, but it works with any stewed fruit.



https://www.theguardian.com/food/2020/jul/04/use-up-bruised-stone-fruit-in-this-boozy-crumble-alike-recipe-tom-hunt



Source


This is a cobbler according to the website:



Source


This is a crisp according to the website:



Source
 
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How bout a slump?
 
Anne Miller
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That is a new one for me.  Does it look like a dish made with dumplings?

According to this website, this is a fruit slump:



Source
 
Rob Lineberger
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Anne Miller wrote:That is a new one for me.  Does it look like a dish made with dumplings?



That's it!  They are delicious.  I usually make them in baking dishes with lots of dumplings on top and a sprinkle of sugar to carmelize.  Lemon zest is another secret weapon in the berry mix to offset the sugar and tartness.
 
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I think what you are calling a slump I call a cobbler,  stewed fruit (or meat) with a topping that is in reality just scones but when it cooks in the sauce you get a crispy top and a dumpling like bottom. Not a single sheet though like I see pictures of cobblers online.
This one looks like what I make, though the method is very different for the topping.

Link
A crisp is a crumble over here.  
And here's another one for you a Clafoutis

Link
 
Anne Miller
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Skandi mentions Clafoutis.  I did not add it to the thread since to me this is not a cobbler-type dish, like the Bettie or the crisp.  I read that it is a french tart and I consider it an egg dish.  I thought it looks a lot like the Buckle.  I don't know since I never really had either in real life.

At Wheaton Lab they make a Clafoutis which sounded so yummy that I went out and found a recipe, then adapted that recipe so it was easy to remember.

Here is my recipe for Clafoutis:

https://permies.com/t/101228/kitchen/RECIPE-Simple-Clafoutis

 
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I set out the Glaskins Perpetual rhubarb that you can pick all summer due to the low oxalic acid. I've been letting it grow but when the frost came ohh! I mixed it with peaches yum yum!  Now I have to get more and plant more peaches.





 
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I was reading this thinking of a French fruit cake I make, not eggy like a clafoutis but very similar to a buckle.

Also, like the slump, but better suited to the heat of summer: replace the dumplings (or the crumbs of the cobbler) with meringue. I don't have a name for it (surely one exists) but it is always a big hit.
 
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Anne Miller wrote:Skandi mentions Clafoutis.  I did not add it to the thread since to me this is not a cobbler-type dish, like the Bettie or the crisp.  I read that it is a french tart and I consider it an egg dish.  I thought it looks a lot like the Buckle.  I don't know since I never really had either in real life.

At Wheaton Lab they make a Clafoutis which sounded so yummy that I went out and found a recipe, then adapted that recipe so it was easy to remember.

Here is my recipe for Clafoutis:

https://permies.com/t/101228/kitchen/RECIPE-Simple-Clafoutis



Thank you - I will try your version!  Just to let you know that I posted another very simple one that I like very much in that thread.  I make it in a simple pie plate as opposed to cast iron, and it works nicely.
 
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The food section in my local newspaper featured cafloutis this week, and now here on permies too! I have not tried a sweet one, made my first savory version today.

As far as the call of the question, in my family this is how we used the terms:

A "brown Betty" is a kind of fruit-based bread pudding made with dry bread cubes, fruit, sugar, and a lot of butter.

A "crisp" is fruit topped with a crumbly/crunchy mix of oats, butter, sugar and maybe nuts.

A "cobbler" is fruit topped with dollops of a sweet batter, then a dusting of starch, sugar, and spice, and boiling water poured over before it is baked. It gets a crisp crust over the rather cakey top. I think this is actually what other people call a "batter cake." It is not like to more biscuity cobbler that Skandi posted (which also looks delicious).

One aunt tried making the cobbler upside down (fruit on top of dough) and it was more like what others here are calling a "slump," but she still called it cobbler.
 
Burl Smith
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Mk Neal wrote:

A "cobbler" is fruit topped with dollops of a sweet batter, then a dusting of starch, sugar, and spice, and boiling water poured over before it is baked. It gets a crisp crust over the rather cakey top. I think this is actually what other people call a "batter cake." It is not like to more biscuity cobbler that Skandi posted (which also looks delicious).



I'll have to try that version.



 
Mk Neal
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Here is my family cobbler recipe:
20201020_085203.jpg
Fruit Cobbler recipe
Fruit Cobbler recipe
 
Burl Smith
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I find cobbler to be quicker than pie crust (my pie crusts-lol) Now I need to adapt the cobbler to pumpkin.



 
Tereza Okava
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Burl Smith wrote: pumpkin.


Burl, it isn`t cobbler (although you could top it with whatever you like), but have you tried the impossible pumpkin pie? Bakes up solid-ish like a thick pudding or cheesecake, no crust. Many recipes use bisquick but there are plenty out there that are scratch, they're easy and if you feel like skipping crust for whatever reason, it's a good alternative.
(i'm on team "no crust")
 
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