• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Anne Miller
  • Pearl Sutton
  • r ranson
  • Nicole Alderman
stewards:
  • Joseph Lofthouse
  • paul wheaton
  • Mike Haasl
master gardeners:
  • jordan barton
  • John F Dean
  • Carla Burke
  • Greg Martin
gardeners:
  • Jay Angler
  • Leigh Tate
  • thomas rubino

Green Lumber concern in underground shelter

 
pollinator
Posts: 227
Location: Hardiness Zone 5
80
hugelkultur purity forest garden chicken wofati woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I'm worried about what I just did.
I'm building Mike Oehler style earth integrated shelter.
I started a small portion of a wall using fresh cut hemlock lumber (2 x 10's).
Polyethlyne on the back, cardboard behind that, then back filled with gravel & dirt.

Will the lumber dry out properly from the air exposed side? Or will it mildew/rot?

Green-Hemlock-Shoring.png
green hemlock shoring
green hemlock shoring
 
master gardener
Posts: 2154
Location: southern Illinois.
530
goat cat dog chicken composting toilet food preservation bee solar wood heat homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
What will actually happen is questionable.  Like you, I have concerns.  Frankly, I would be more comfortable with dry wood coated with something to inhibit mold growth.  The only time I have taken on the use of green wood in a serious project was for siding on a cabin. That worked out ok. But, there was plenty of air circulation.
 
master gardener
Posts: 787
Location: Coastal Salish Sea area, British Columbia - USDA zone 8-9
360
goat books chicken food preservation pig solar homestead
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
so jason.


When you say fresh cut. Does this mean the tree was fallen on Monday and than on Wednesday the tree was cut up into lumber?


Or do you mean the tree was fallen 1 year ago and it was just cut up before you used it?


Which one? can you give us more detail please :)
 
pollinator
Posts: 1577
Location: Victoria BC
229
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I have returned to a hemlock log that was down for perhaps 9 months and found the underside rotted to mush, several inches into the log.. Obviously in contact with wet ground is worse than your situation, but it left me with a very poor opinion of the durability of hemlock. No other wood in my region would rot nearly that fast.

 
Jason Vath
pollinator
Posts: 227
Location: Hardiness Zone 5
80
hugelkultur purity forest garden chicken wofati woodworking
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

jordan barton wrote:so jason.


When you say fresh cut. Does this mean the tree was fallen on Monday and than on Wednesday the tree was cut up into lumber?


Or do you mean the tree was fallen 1 year ago and it was just cut up before you used it?


Which one? can you give us more detail please :)




Not sure as I boght rough cut lumber from an amish mill.
But the wood was really white in color, super heavy & very damp.

By the way, I just took down the wall and will let the wood naturally dry out before redoing it.
 
Posts: 7
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
You might want to check out a Japanese wood burning technique called shou sugi ban. It’s visually best on Cedar but you can use it on most wood including Hemlock. It produces a layer of carbon that preserves and waterproofs the wood and as a bonus keeps mold and bugs away. It also looks really cool and all you need is a blow torch which is a lot of fun.
 
jordan barton
master gardener
Posts: 787
Location: Coastal Salish Sea area, British Columbia - USDA zone 8-9
360
goat books chicken food preservation pig solar homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Jason Vath wrote:

jordan barton wrote:so jason.


When you say fresh cut. Does this mean the tree was fallen on Monday and than on Wednesday the tree was cut up into lumber?


Or do you mean the tree was fallen 1 year ago and it was just cut up before you used it?


Which one? can you give us more detail please :)




Not sure as I boght rough cut lumber from an amish mill.
But the wood was really white in color, super heavy & very damp.

By the way, I just took down the wall and will let the wood naturally dry out before redoing it.



sounds like a great idea jason. No point creating future problems.

We have about 1000 BF of 1x10 balsam wood drying inside our house. Our back room is filled with the stuff. We are hoping to get it to the driest point possible before we put in on the walls. time time time

Good luck!
 
This guy is skipping without a rope. At least, that's what this tiny ad said:
100th Issue of Permaculture Magazine - now FREE for a while
https://permies.com/goodies/45/pmag
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic