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Indoor plants for apartment with no direct sunlight?

 
pollinator
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...and poor air flow, high humidity, and small space...

I do have the garden, but I like to have some plants indoors, too. Other than sprouts.

I successfuly grew pitaya cacti from seeds collected from a market fruit; but they stopped growing. I'll probably sell them. They are potential fruit crops, because they could bear edible fruits, but in better conditions...

They need more air movement (but no wind) and more sun (but not too much), perfect for a greenhouse or a winter garden patio. They develop mould each time they're watered, even if they're completely dry before.

However, maybe there are some plants that could survive in such place, and even do something good? For example: clean the air, suck up excess humidity, and not take up much space. They don't even have to produce edible fancy fruits...

Windows are to the North and the same relatively small area serves as a bedroom, kitchen and bathroom (which is somewhat separate, but the kitchen is not, and doesn't have a cooker hood).

Here is one of the poor pitayas - now about 2 years old - in a hanging pot which I made of calabash and crocheted net.


Edited to reduce size of the photo...
pitaya-suspended.jpg
Pitaya in a calabash pot
Pitaya in a calabash pot
 
Posts: 37
Location: Billings, MT
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Mother in law's tongue is well known for being able to handle very low levels of light (like, incidental light from fluorescents in an office building low levels), and is supposed to be one of the best plants for removing indoor air contaminants. Stupid easy to grow indoors
 
master pollinator
Posts: 871
Location: Canadian Prairies - Zone 3b
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Devil's Ivy is a classic indoor succulent that doesn't need much of anything to thrive. You can propagate them from another plant. Note that this is an invasive species in many places, so be careful.
 
pollinator
Posts: 580
Location: West Yorkshire, UK
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Sounds like the perfect conditions for potted orchids.  Ferns too!
 
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Location: north Georgia, USA
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Jungle plants grow in low light on the  forest floor, but tend to need more humidity than a home in winter can provide.
Two solutions:
1. Create a moist micro-climate by putting plants in a broad saucer with pea gravel and a bit of water or enclose your planting area with clear pliastic or glass.
2. Select plants from tropical forests that have a dry season rather than rain forest plants. These plants can handle lower humidity better than rain forest plants.
You could start by trying Cast Iron Plant (Aspidistra), Selloum philodendron (gets large), Mother-in-law's tongue (Sanseveria) as has been previously suggested, Draceana.
The list of suitable plants is actually much larger, but this should get you started.
 
gardener
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I always think of pitaya as a cactus- here it's grown on top of walls, usually, to get as much sun as possible.

Your space sounds like my office- minimal natural light!
I have a peace lily, which can survive anything, a Zamioculcas (which seems to be happy with anything as long as it's not overwatered), a prayer plant (Maranta- supposed to love dark places but frankly seems very sad no matter what I do), and a fern. I have minimal natural light. Thanks to the reminders, I have a Dracaena outside that I will probably repot and and add to the crowd here.
 
pollinator
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How big a plant? A swiss cheese plant will do fine in those conditions, as will some orchids phalaenopsis like damp and low(ish) light, we have one in the bathroom. Spiderplants would also be fine.
 
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If you want to expand indoor there are all kinds of low cost to run led growing lights available. huge progress has been made in this are in past few years.
 
pollinator
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Location: Hamburg, Germany
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Aloe vera's very hard to kill and reproduces even with neglect.  After giving away my 2 big monsters, I have like 10 little guys sitting on a northern windowsill that I remember to sprinkle water over maybe once a week.  You'll never get the 1-meter swords they grow outside in Spain, so if your goal is daily drinking their juice you're out of luck, but they're nice for minor cuts and burns.
 
Flora Eerschay
pollinator
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Location: Poland
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Thanks, everyone! I chose Sansevieria (the "snake plant"), because it doesn't expand too much. Wikipedia says that it can yield fiber to make bowstrings! Maybe I'll make twine of it. I'm so obsessed with permaculture now, that I just can't have a plant that doesn't "do" anything... ;)
And the pitayas will go to more sunny places.
 
pollinator
Posts: 202
Location: Dry mountains Eastern WA
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Aspidistra; cast iron plant.  Lovely but hard to find. Grows in a hole.  Us3d a lot in 5he 1800’sin dark hotel lobbies
 
pollinator
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Location: Chicago
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In my office I have a ZZ plant (that is the name).  I grows in low light with very little water.  Took it 5 years to kind of outgrow its pot.
 
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