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Good gluten free sandwich bread recipes?

 
gardener
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Location: Ontario - Gardening in zone 3b, 4b, or 6b, depending on the day
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We have been eating a lot of expensive purchased gluten free bread here lately.

I want to get back to making my own, but the recipe we used to use is about 30 years old, doesnt slice as a loaf, just buns, and one of the ingredients (egg replacer) is impossible to get in store right now. It was much better than store bread 15-20 years ago, not as good as modern bread. Would be nice to get something as fluffy and noncrumbly as modern store bread.

Any favourites?

Bonus points :
-I prefer recipes that call for x or y flour rather than a flour blend, as i have been baking since long before those were available,  and every country has their own.
-Using up garden produce :)
- Whole grain flours rather than white flours
 
gardener
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Hi Catie, Here is my best friend's whole grain gf bread recipe.  It's NOT fluffy but IMO, tastes amazing - like the whole wheat bread I miss.  It holds together well.  And it avoids the starches that I prefer not to use in my baking.  So I don't know if it fits the bill for you or not.  She has another one that uses a lot more starch and is more palatable to her family for their every day eating (and more like store bought bread).  I'll share that recipe when she sends it to me, in case it's a better fit.  Sonja

********************

Mary’s Whole-Grain Gluten Free Bread (1 loaf)
6 oz. sorghum
5 oz. brown rice
1 oz. buckwheat
1 oz. teff
2 oz. amaranth
1 oz. oat flour
4 Tbsp psyllium husks (NOT powder)
16 oz. warm water (115-118 degrees F)
1 TBSP honey or sugar
1.5 tsp dried yeast
1.5 tsp salt
1 tsp white or rice vinegar

• Grind the grains into a fine flour. In a large bowl, combine the flour with oat flour, salt and psyllium
husk.
• Add the sugar and vinegar to the water and mix well. Sprinkle yeast on the top. Cover.
• Let the water mixture sit in a warm place for 10 minutes.
• Line your bread pan with parchment paper (brown, unbleached works best).
• Preheat the oven to 170 degrees F.
• Add the water mixture to the flour mixture and mix well.
• Place the bread dough in the pan.
• Smooth the top of the loaf with damp hands
• When the oven is preheated, turn off the oven and put the loaf in the oven to rise. Set the time for
60 minutes.
• When the timer rings, take the bread out as gently as possible. Heat the oven to 465 degrees F.
• After the oven is preheated, place the loaf gently back in the oven for 35 minutes. When done, the
loaf will be browned and sound hollow when you knock on the bottom of the pan-less loaf.)
• Remove loaf from pan and cool on a cooling rack.
• It’s easiest to slice the loaf when completely cool.
 
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Catie, this doesn't answer your original question, but egg replacer can easily be mixed up at home (I moved to a country where it can't be bought and this recipe has been well-proven). this is what I used, although I think i ended up making much smaller batches. http://www.veganbaking.net/recipes/egg-replacers/eggless-binder-powder
I was unable to get xanthan gum for quite a while and it worked okay for general vegan baking without it, but as you know from GF baking you're probably going to need that xanthan gum. As for starches, I have made it with tapioca, potato, and arrowroot, all are pretty much the same.
 
pollinator
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The powerhungry website has a few sandwich bread recipes.  I think they're all grain free, so maybe not what you had in mind, though.  I haven't actually tried any of her sandwich breads, but I've had good results from other recipes on her site and the sandwich breads have good comments from other people.  She often uses chickpea flour in them.  I don't have an oven, so my "bread" is pancakes and crepes, usually made with chickpea flour.  From how it behaves in pancakes, I could see it doing really well in bread.

This is her kinda white bread recipe:

Ingredients

   1 and 1/2 cups (180 g) chickpea flour, sifted if lumpy
   1 and 1/4 cups (140 g) blanched almond flour
   1 tablespoon baking powder
   (optional/variable) 1/4 teaspoon fine sea salt
   1 and 3/4 cups (425 mL) water

Instructions

   Preheat oven to 400F (200C). Spray or grease a 9×5-inch (22.5×12.5 cm) loaf pan.
   In a large bowl, whisk together the almond flour, chickpea flour, baking powder, and (optional) salt.
   Add the water, whisking until completley combined.  Immediately pour into prepared pan.
   Bake in the preheated oven for 40 to 45 minutes until golden brown and risen and a toothpick inserted near the center comes out with only moist crumbs attached.
   Transfer pan to a cooling rack and cool bread in pan for 20 minutes. Run a butter knife around edge of pan to loosen; remove bread and cool completely before slicing.



Her whole wheat type bread is lentils, tapioca starch, and psyllium.

Ingredients

   1 and 1/2 cups (300 g) uncooked brown lentils
   water to cover lentils
   1/2 cup water
   1 tablespoon olive oil (or oil of choice)
   3/4 teaspoon fine sea salt
   1/2 cup (60 g) tapioca starch
   1 tablespoon psyllium husk
   2 and 1/2 teaspoons baking powder

Instructions

   Rinse the lentils to remove any debris and then place in a large bowl. Fill the bowl with enough water to cover the lentils by at least 1 inch (2.5 cm). Soak for at least 2 hours or up to 24 hours. Drain the lentils and transfer to a blender.
   Preheat oven to 400F (200C). Line a 9×5-inch (22.5 x 12.5 cm) loaf pan with parchment paper (leaving an overhang). Grease or spray exposed interior sides of pan.
   Add the 1/2 cup water, oil and salt to the blender with the lentils. Process, stopping several times to scrape sides and bottom of blender, until completley smooth.
   Scoop the lentil mixture into a large bowl. Stir in the tapioca starch, psyllium husk and baking powder until completely blended. Spoon batter into prepared pan, smoothing the top. Give the loaf pan a bang on countertop to release any large bubbles. Re-smooth the top, if needed.
   Bake in the preheated oven for 48 to 53 minutes until golden brown and bread sounds hollow when tapped.
   Remove bread from pan and cool completely on a wire rack. Slice and eat as desired!



One of the things I love about her site is that when people ask about substitutions in the comments below the recipe, she's got all kind of helpful tips.  Most bloggers just answer with the standard, "Sorry, I haven't tried that, but let us know how it goes."
 
Catie George
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Thanks Sonja, Jan! Those look really good.

Sonja - that recipe has some of my favourite GF flours in it, so looks really tasty. Tasty + sliceable/not crumbly >> fluffy.

Jan- Lentils in bread sound really tasty! I even know somewhere i can get chickpea flour (or maybe i have some buried in the back of the cupboard. Hmmm). Also, i love the idea of eating bread made of more things i could theoretically grow in my garden.

Tereza - i might try that egg replacer replacer recipe in another recipe. This one is fiddly enough i don't feel like using it anymore (eggs AND egg replacer, proofing gelatin, etc), plus its all white starches (rice, potato, tapioca) and my tastes have advanced to the better tasting whole grain GF flours now that they are available.
 
Sonja Draven
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Catie George wrote:

Sonja - that recipe has some of my favourite GF flours in it, so looks really tasty. Tasty + sliceable/not crumbly >> fluffy.


She said to add that, assuming you're not anti microwave, you can revive this bread when it's older with a quick heat. I can confirm!
 
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