• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Anne Miller
  • Nicole Alderman
  • r ranson
  • Pearl Sutton
  • Mike Haasl
  • paul wheaton
stewards:
  • Joylynn Hardesty
  • Dave Burton
  • Joseph Lofthouse
master gardeners:
  • jordan barton
  • Greg Martin
gardeners:
  • Carla Burke
  • Ash Jackson
  • Kate Downham

Plant identification

 
Posts: 5
Location: TX, 8a
goat pig sheep
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I have 2 great dane pups, 3 months old. We moved into a rental house and there was some plants growing a bit but they've grown a lot more since we've moved in. They are on the side of the yard by the fence, it looks like someone attempted gardening there. The pups tend to find their way over there laying in it or trying to nibble on things. I am wondering what these plants are so I can look them up and make sure they aren't harmful to their curious mouths and stomachs.

Any help in identifying them would be great!
20200912_135849.jpg
There's a decent amount of this vining plant. It has those little flowers sporadically about it. It has sprawled out of the area and toward the grass now
There's a decent amount of this vining plant. It has those little flowers sporadically about it. It has sprawled out of the area and toward the grass now
20200912_135933.jpg
Another picture of the vine plant
Another picture of the vine plant
20200912_135924.jpg
Spikey leaves, has some sort or clustered little buildings happening at the top
Spikey leaves, has some sort or clustered little buildings happening at the top
20200912_135954.jpg
Another pic of the spikey leaf plant
Another pic of the spikey leaf plant
20200912_140020.jpg
I think this is the only plant of this kind
I think this is the only plant of this kind
20200912_140032.jpg
There is also a decent amount of this. It seems to have spread all the way through the grass and to the tree. It has what look like little yellow flowers growing?
There is also a decent amount of this. It seems to have spread all the way through the grass and to the tree. It has what look like little yellow flowers growing?
 
gardener
Posts: 434
Location: Western Kentucky
165
dog gear foraging trees hunting food preservation cooking fiber arts woodworking wood heat rocket stoves
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
First is Morning Glory. Keep them under control or they can take over.
 
pollinator
Posts: 283
Location: the mountains of western nc
70
forest garden trees foraging chicken food preservation cooking wood heat homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
where are you located? second to last picture looks like a young hackberry tree.
 
R Vaughn
Posts: 5
Location: TX, 8a
goat pig sheep
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Jordan Holland wrote:First is Morning Glory. Keep them under control or they can take over.



Yes you're right! I googled it and that's exactly what it looks like! It does seem to be in it's own area of the "garden" but it has begun sprawling out onto the grass. Do I just trim it back into the bed or will that kill it if I just cut the length back?
 
R Vaughn
Posts: 5
Location: TX, 8a
goat pig sheep
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

greg mosser wrote:where are you located? second to last picture looks like a young hackberry tree.



I am in Texas, 8a hardiness zone. I don't know what sprouting hackberry trees look like so I am not sure. The leaves are definitely a darker green than any of the other plants.
 
Jordan Holland
gardener
Posts: 434
Location: Western Kentucky
165
dog gear foraging trees hunting food preservation cooking fiber arts woodworking wood heat rocket stoves
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

R Vaughn wrote:

Jordan Holland wrote:First is Morning Glory. Keep them under control or they can take over.



Yes you're right! I googled it and that's exactly what it looks like! It does seem to be in it's own area of the "garden" but it has begun sprawling out onto the grass. Do I just trim it back into the bed or will that kill it if I just cut the length back?



On the ground they may not be too bad, but if they get a chance to climb, they will cover anything. They also produce copious amounts of seeds that appear to remain viable indefinitely. They are extremely hardy here, virtually impossible to kill.
 
Posts: 7638
Location: Ozarks zone 7 alluvial,black,deep clay/loam with few rocks, wonderful creek bottom!
1465
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
The second plant might be this https://florapittsburghensis.wordpress.com/2010/08/16/green-poinsettia-euphorbia-dentata/

I've been trying to ID something similar but not quite the same as yours here in the Ozarks.
 
R Vaughn
Posts: 5
Location: TX, 8a
goat pig sheep
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Judith Browning wrote:The second plant might be this https://florapittsburghensis.wordpress.com/2010/08/16/green-poinsettia-euphorbia-dentata/

I've been trying to ID something similar but not quite the same as yours here in the Ozarks.




It does look like what you posted! Thanks for the find! This plant said it is toxic to mammals if eaten so it looks like I might want to pull them if the pups won't stop nibbling on things because that is the plant that has migrated out of the side and all the way to the tree already!
 
gardener
Posts: 566
Location: Central Texas
208
hugelkultur forest garden trees rabbit greening the desert homestead
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I'm also in Texas, 8a, and have all of these growing in my fields

First is definitely wild morning glory... I fight with it every year because it has tried to consume my greenhouse and other structures (and drops thousands of seeds each fall).
I always thought the second one was lambsquarters. Glad to learn that isn't the case.
The sapling (third) appears to be a young cedar elm. The wood chips I used on the garden last fall was full of cedar elm berries, so I've been chopping them out of the garden all spring and summer.
The common name for the last one is straggler daisy. It makes a pretty dense ground cover in the fall. I believe I've seen my geese munch on it, but they'll eat almost anything, so I can't say it's not toxic.
 
Judith Browning
Posts: 7638
Location: Ozarks zone 7 alluvial,black,deep clay/loam with few rocks, wonderful creek bottom!
1465
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

I always thought the second one was lambsquarters. Glad to learn that isn't the case.


Definitely not lambsquarters.

I would consider rampant lambsquarters a bonus!

Lambsquarters is one of my favorite wild greens that we encourage to volunteer wherever it likes

Best as a cooked green in my opinion....but be sure of an ID of course.
 
Drove my Chevy to the levee but the levee was dry. I wrung this tiny ad and it was still dry.
BWB second printing, pre-order dealio (poor man's poll)
https://permies.com/t/147624/BWB-printing-pre-order-dealio
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic