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Help my Pear Trees please!

 
Posts: 65
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My two pear tree's leaves are looking like the picture...
IMG_2872.jpg
[Thumbnail for IMG_2872.jpg]
 
master pollinator
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Location: Officially Zone 7b, according to personal obsevations I live in 7a, SW Tennessee
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Maybe if we can see a picture of the tree itself, a diagnosis may be forthcoming...

Sometimes seeing the whole tree shows additional information.
 
Troy Docimo
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I'll provide some pictures tomorrow...
 
Troy Docimo
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Here are some pictures
IMG_2880.JPG
[Thumbnail for IMG_2880.JPG]
IMG_2882.JPG
[Thumbnail for IMG_2882.JPG]
IMG_2883.JPG
[Thumbnail for IMG_2883.JPG]
 
gardener
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Troy, those look pretty rough, did you check for images of the most common pear diseases online? I have the impression many pears have scruffy looking leaves. Some still carried fruit while many of their leaves were not perfect at all. Especially when they are quite young and have been replanted into place.
The grass looks like there hasn't been tree growth for years. Many trees need to establish specific mycorrhyzal funghi connections to flourish. On such a field they are a rare feature. And after a dry spell it can be that the rootsystem just is not developed enough to support all the leaves. There might be an imbalance between the root/leaves ratio. As leaves evaporate they need a certain root system to be in place if not the tree can drop its leaves as a emergency measure.
Sorry, i just give some general advice, i am no tree specialist, i hope someone can help you more specifically. I just want to say i worried about my pears as well and they carry quite some pears today.
Good luck
 
Troy Docimo
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I bought the property 4 years ago, there were only two dying peach trees on it. I planted these in the spring, they grew beautiful, a couple of feet. now im dealing with this...
 
gardener
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Lots of compost and lots of woodchips might help.
 
Troy Docimo
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Thank you.
 
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Location: Ozarks zone 7 alluvial,black,deep clay/loam with few rocks, wonderful creek bottom!
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I think the dark areas at least, look like early signs of fire blight.
It is hard on pear trees, especially during damp humid summers.

Our bartlett got hit bad last year and I pruned and pruned to keep up with removing the affected branches and leaves.
The anjou was not bothered as much, just occasional leaves and our asian pears not at all.

Check out other advice for fire blight.  I've always followed the 'removal' plan and lately have planted more asian pears that seem less bothered by it.

I've seen old old farmstead pear trees that don't seem to get it or never bad enough to kill the tree.

The crinklyness of the leaves looks like something else though?
 
Judith Browning
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Location: Ozarks zone 7 alluvial,black,deep clay/loam with few rocks, wonderful creek bottom!
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Here's more about possible causes of
blackened leaves...maybe fungal since the blackened leaves are all over the tree? https://homeguides.sfgate.com/black-leaves-damage-pear-trees-33992.html

 
Troy Docimo
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Thank you!
 
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Location: Nova Scotia, Canada, Zone 6a, Rain ~60"
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I had a pear tree with leaf blister mite a while ago. I was able to almost completely eliminate it in a couple of years by spraying the tree all over with a 48-hour brew of compost tea. I sprayed twice, two weeks apart at the beginning of the season.
As I understand it, the microbes in compost tea can assist with a number of fungal and other diseases. You could do a little research to see if anyone else has treated blight successfully with compost tea. It really worked for the mites.

People with a lot more compost tea knowledge than I have know how to adjust the length of the brewing time to maximize different microbial populations and effects. That's part of the trick.
Good luck with your trees!
 
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You need nutrients for you tree. Dig up the soil (not deep, just loosen it) about a foot around the tree. Get a bag of compost, worm castings and follow with wood chips. Also some mushroom dirt couldn’t hurt. Another thing you could do is pour a cup of compost tea around it and water it in. Should be right as rain.
 
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