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native sweet pecans

 
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does anyone have experience with. these trees. are the pecans any good? I'm assuming this is a non hybrid variety. the kind that grew naturally before europeans came to the americas. tree sales just opened up and I can get these seedlings for about $0.48 each if I get 500 of them.
 
pollinator
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Location: Nevada, Mo 64772
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What part of the world are you in? Native northern pecans have a higher oil content and more flavor than the southern, easier to crack pecans. But southern pecans won’t grow too far north and northern pecans won’t grow too far south. If you are in a pecan growing region you can probably find a farm store that will crack them for you.

They are very nice trees and need little care most years.  Fall webworms can be a problem.

The biggest problem with seedlings is that they can take up to 20 years to produce.  I am not that patient. I have some that are about 15. No nuts yet. Another problem is that some seedlings will produce tiny nuts or just not be at all productive. I would really recommend planting at least two grafted varieties, then if you need a lot of trees you can plant some seedlings too.  Make make sure the pollination times of the grafted trees overlap.  Grafted varieties are not hybrids. They are just selected varieties grafted onto other pecan rootstock. The genetics don’t mix. This has been done for hundreds of years. If you don’t want to spend the money on grafted trees, you could plant seedlings and graft good varieties onto them.

 
pollinator
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Location: Central Texas zone 8a, 800 chill hours 28 blessed inches of rain
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Where are you finding seedlings for 4 bits?  I would be curious.  Native pecans taste better but don't have economic value due to their low 'meat' content compared to hybrids.  Native pecan saplings are used as graft stock, however.  
 
Ken W Wilson
pollinator
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Location: Nevada, Mo 64772
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Missouri Conservation has them 10 for 10.00. Cheaper if you buy more. They sell out fast. I don’t think they would do well in Texas.  We are really humid in the summer and pretty cold in the winter.
 
bruce Fine
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state dept of forestry seedling sale program, most states have em. in fact Virginia has apple and pear trees they will ship out of state, w Virginia has Chinese chestnuts, Tennessee has these pecans , at last look 38000 still available
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