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plants that will clean your grease trap

 
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Has anyone experimented with or have any ideas of plants that would grow in the extremely nutrient rich medium that is the domestic grease trap?


Just trying to think of a way of avoiding cleaning it out.
 
pollinator
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I have not heard of any plants that can help at the moment.
But have you thought of placing a basket in the trap which you can just pull up and out?
 
John C Daley
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It is possible to use Enzymes to munch the mess.
 
pollinator
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You know I had never heard of a grease trap, reading on them it seems they are only on commercial kitchens here. Which explains why I had not heard about them. I would think the main issue with plants wouldn't be the nutrition but the lack of oxygen when everything gets gunked up with fat.

But to avoid cleaning it out. avoid putting grease down the drain. scrape it all out into the bin before you wash anything out, that's what we do. Yes a tiny bit will still make it but we've not in over 20 years had any issues with fat in drains or sinks.
 
Tom Pivac
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Good point


So maybe if some kind of anaerobic bacteria was encouraged to grow in it.
 
John C Daley
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Its very smart to have a grease trap on your home, it saves a lot of expensive cleaning of septic tank and lines if you are unlucky.

Management within the kitchen is a good place to start as mentioned'
I use newspaper to soak up oils and fats, sometimes paper wipes which are easier to use than newspaper.
 
pollinator
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Plants usually don't rotten apples, or grease, it's the microbes/decomposter that break them down and help the plants that follow after.

There are fungi that break plastic and oil spill so a bit of grease, should be fine. I know that koji, will also digest oil too. And microbes in septic tank also digest grease. I think that as long as some woodchip is added to the mix, microbes will remove it in no time.

Also it turns out that in return for minerals from the soil, tree trade fatty acids in addition to sugars with fungi.
https://phys.org/news/2017-06-biology-uncovers-high-fat-diet-fungal.html
 
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They are working on something like this for the passive wofati greenhouse!
I think their last assessment was a mini-septic tank to avoid the grease clogging the pipes issue :-/
 
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I don't know of any plants that have been used that way, but that doesn't mean they don't exist. I would probably start with saponin-rich plants like yucca or soapwort. The saponins will leach into the soil and break down the grease.
 
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Plants seem unlikely,  but taking the stuff from a grease trap and feeding it to BSF should work nicely.
 
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