• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • r ranson
  • Anne Miller
  • Pearl Sutton
  • Mike Haasl
stewards:
  • paul wheaton
  • Joylynn Hardesty
  • Dave Burton
master gardeners:
  • jordan barton
  • Greg Martin
  • Steve Thorn
gardeners:
  • Carla Burke
  • Jay Angler
  • Kate Downham

r (attempts to) sew a button down blouse for curvy people

 
master steward & author
Posts: 20422
Location: Left Coast Canada
5662
books chicken cooking fiber arts sheep writing
  • Likes 8
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Someone mentioned elsewhere that the Harrision Shirt is designed for people of my shape.  Curvy!

After much reading of the description and reviews, I decided to make the Harrison Shirt by  Cashmerette Patterns.  



I subscribed to the class as well which includes the pattern.  It has good reviews online and claims to cover everything I need to know.  My sewing skillset is self-taught by trial and error, so it would be good to learn how normal people do things.  The goal is to be able to sew a big chunk of my wardrobe, so this is an investment in that future.  (also the class came to exactly the same amount I got from my first Stock Photography payment, so I figured it was meant to be).  The class also includes a free copy of the pattern.  Well, the PDF copy is free, the paper copy costs shipping.  I went with the PDF copy.

A sampling of techniques you’ll learn in this course:
How to choose the perfect fabric for the type of shirt you want

My favourite tools for a professional finish

Sewing a shirt using just a sewing machine or together with a serger

How to sew a smooth princess seams without wrinkles or tucks

Sewing a button band with a clean finish at the hem

How to create a completely clean yoke using the "burrito" method

A collar construction method that leaves you with fantastic sharp points

And many more tips and techniques that go beyond the instruction booklet!



I'm very excited.  I bought some fabric.

I don't know if I'll manage it, but I am encouraged!
 
steward & bricolagier
Posts: 5828
Location: SW Missouri
2592
goat cat fungi books chicken earthworks food preservation cooking building homestead ungarbage
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Cool! Yes, that is for curvy people, and REALLY easy to adjust as needed. I think you will like it :D
 
r ranson
master steward & author
Posts: 20422
Location: Left Coast Canada
5662
books chicken cooking fiber arts sheep writing
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
This week I went fabric shopping.  There are two stores in my city that I know about, so I went to the biggest/cheapest.  And I counted the queue to get in the door (I'm very glad they are practising social distancing and crowd control!) and there were over 30 people waiting in line.  I sat in the car for a while deciding, and after 5 min, 4 more people joined the queue and none left the store.  I don't want to stand out in the hot sun for over an hour.  What other options?

The second option is to go all the way downtown and deal with the crowds there.  No thank you.  

But then we remembered a lovely person recommended a shop in the next town over.  It's mostly quilting paraphernalia, but quilters need fabric too.  What's more, quilters have a lot more natural fibres than most apparel cloth these days.  Quilting cotton would be an okay start for my shirt making adventures.

So I went.

There was lots of staff there and, unlike big-box-fabric-cheep-shop, the staff were kind and helpful.  I told them the project I'm working on and that I know nothing, and they showed me suggestions on which kind of fabric and prints to try.   Most everyone was wearing masks, except for a couple of customers.  But I really liked was that masks weren't mandatory, but they were expected.  I think peer pressure is the best way to get people to wear masks.  Although, I do like it when shops hand out masks during this time, like the thrift store down the road.  (by the way, I have been to several thrift shops these last few weeks and all the cotton sheets and sewing supplies seem to be sold out - I think I'm not the only one using the pandemic as an excuse to learn to sew)





I settled on two cloths.  Although I like the light one better, I thought maybe the dark one would work?  Maybe?  I hope so because there are no returns.



I got 4 yards meters of each.  The pattern says I need 3 and 1/4 yards, but the video says that the fabric needs are generous and designed for uni-directional patterns.  I got four meters with the idea that I might have enough left over to make a matching tank/vest top for underneath.  Or if I make mistakes.  It's good to have extra fabric for learning with too.

But it was a bit more expensive than I had hoped, it was within my budget (just) that I've been saving up for this year's clothing shopping.  Actually, it was almost exactly the same price that I would pay for 2 shirts in my size after shipping and customs.  And those shirts won't fit me properly anyway.  These shirts might.

I didn't get buttons yet but I'm kind of hoping I can find something in the button jar.

For me, I'm fussy about buttons.  They are the element that makes or breaks a bit of clothing.  The buttons in the shop were okay, but not matching the fabric.  

I know enough not to make the buttonholes until I decide on the button.
 
r ranson
master steward & author
Posts: 20422
Location: Left Coast Canada
5662
books chicken cooking fiber arts sheep writing
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I do want to mention one thing that was a big disappointment right from the start.

One of the reasons I choose this pattern is because it says in the FAQ:

What sewing equipment do I need?
You'll need a sewing machine with a straight stitch and a buttonhole foot, and although it's nice to have a serger too, it's not necessary. Then, you'll need a basic sewing toolkit - a PDF supplies list is included in the course - and your materials for the shirt (see the listing for details).



My sewing machine looks like this



It sews forwards in a straight line, and if I put the buttonhole attachment on, it makes buttonholes.  That's what it can do.  It doesn't go backwards unless I change direction by swivelling the cloth the other way.

It made me happy to see that I wouldn't require a zig-zag stitch to do this pattern.  

Only, lesson one of the class has us using a zig-zag stitch to finish the princess seams.  Either that or a serger.

There was no mention of this PRIOR to purchase.  

It's actually a big deal for me and might break the entire project.  Unless I can find a different way of finishing the seam edges?  I love enclosed seams, but how to do that on a princess seam?  I can't see it.  Could I bind the seam?  

Help?!?
 
r ranson
master steward & author
Posts: 20422
Location: Left Coast Canada
5662
books chicken cooking fiber arts sheep writing
  • Likes 5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Anyone else doing this as a PDF file, RTFI - read the Friggen instructions! - before printing all 43 pages!

The video didn't say this, but the instructions suggest we can select just the lines we need.  So, I'm making a Size 16-E/F, so I open the EF file and go to layers - then I unselect sizes 12, 14, 18-28.  That leaves me with JUST the lines I need.  I make certain the grid and the labels are checked.  Yep.  Sweet.  Single sides.  Yep.  Actual size checked? Yep.  Test page to make sure the grid is 1 inch.  Yep.  PRINT!

What a wonderful feature.
 
pollinator
Posts: 310
Location: Near Philadelphia, PA
62
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Great machine - I remember my Grandmother had a beautiful one with a foot pedal (does yours, or do you have a motor under the platform?)
 
gardener
Posts: 1656
592
personal care gear foraging hunting rabbit chicken cooking food preservation fiber arts medical herbs homestead
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

r ranson wrote:I do want to mention one thing that was a big disappointment right from the start.

One of the reasons I choose this pattern is because it says in the FAQ:

What sewing equipment do I need?
You'll need a sewing machine with a straight stitch and a buttonhole foot, and although it's nice to have a serger too, it's not necessary. Then, you'll need a basic sewing toolkit - a PDF supplies list is included in the course - and your materials for the shirt (see the listing for details).



My sewing machine looks like this



It sews forwards in a straight line, and if I put the buttonhole attachment on, it makes buttonholes.  That's what it can do.  It doesn't go backwards unless I change direction by swivelling the cloth the other way.

It made me happy to see that I wouldn't require a zig-zag stitch to do this pattern.  

Only, lesson one of the class has us using a zig-zag stitch to finish the princess seams.  Either that or a serger.

There was no mention of this PRIOR to purchase.  

It's actually a big deal for me and might break the entire project.  Unless I can find a different way of finishing the seam edges?  I love enclosed seams, but how to do that on a princess seam?  I can't see it.  Could I bind the seam?  

Help?!?



Options I can think of include, hand stitching - a fine blanket stitch, or other binding stitch would be great, or do a second line of stitching. A finer stitch length (in addition to the binding or 2nd stitch line) might be a good thing, too.
 
pollinator
Posts: 338
Location: Western Kentucky
121
dog gear foraging trees hunting food preservation cooking fiber arts woodworking wood heat rocket stoves
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

r ranson wrote:
My sewing machine looks like this



It sews forwards in a straight line, and if I put the buttonhole attachment on, it makes buttonholes.  That's what it can do.  It doesn't go backwards unless I change direction by swivelling the cloth the other way.

It made me happy to see that I wouldn't require a zig-zag stitch to do this pattern.  

Only, lesson one of the class has us using a zig-zag stitch to finish the princess seams.  Either that or a serger.

There was no mention of this PRIOR to purchase.  

It's actually a big deal for me and might break the entire project.  Unless I can find a different way of finishing the seam edges?  I love enclosed seams, but how to do that on a princess seam?  I can't see it.  Could I bind the seam?  

Help?!?



Is that a 127? The Singer attatchments 160985 and 161102 should fit it for a zig-zag if you run across one for a decent price. I don't think they ever made a back-tacking lever for it like they did the 66. There's nothing wrong with turning the fabric 180 degrees, but from what I've seen, back-tacking and zig-zaging are considered "low quality" by the professionals.🤷‍♂️
 
r ranson
master steward & author
Posts: 20422
Location: Left Coast Canada
5662
books chicken cooking fiber arts sheep writing
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I don't have the zigzag attachment ... yet.

I dream of it.

One day I'll find one.



If memory serves it's a 127.  But I have both 127 and 126 (this one is the newer and larger of the two) as I love the oscillating boat shuttle and the predictability of it.  

This one is a purely treadle machine.  I can't get on well with those new-fangled electric gizmos.
 
steward
Posts: 2965
Location: Officially Zone 7b, according to personal obsevations I live in 7a, SW Tennessee
1081
forest garden foraging books food preservation cooking fiber arts bee medical herbs
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Okay, I'm going to lobby for flat felled seams. Yes, I remember that I said they can be difficult in princess seams.

However, having the four front seams will reduce the difficulties I have experienced. Your 10-inch measurement difference will be spread out, making each seam account for only 2 1/2 inches of it. This, I think will solve the issues I have experienced with flat-felled princess seams in the past.
 
r ranson
master steward & author
Posts: 20422
Location: Left Coast Canada
5662
books chicken cooking fiber arts sheep writing
  • Likes 5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
would bias tape work in some way?  I remember my grandmother talking about it for finishing seams.  She learned to sew in the 1910s and 20s, which is the same age as this machine.  Only she did all her sewing by hand until the late 1950s when they could afford a treadle machine.  She was a seamstress by trade.  

I wish she was here to ask her how they did these things before fancy equipment.

I'm okay with hand finishing the seam if it means the garment will last long.  

The two goals of this are to
1. make something that actually fits
2. make something that actually lasts

If more time invested now means I can wear this top an extra two or three years before it falls apart, I'm okay with that.  

But I don't fully understand how.  I'll spend tonight reading and googling some of the words to understand better the good advice in this thread.
 
gardener
Posts: 461
Location: Ontario - Gardening in zone 3b, 4b, or 6b, depending on the day
279
dog foraging trees tiny house books bike bee
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
You definitely can do one of those fancy rolled hidden seam things for a princess seamed shirt. My fanciest/favourite, a Anne Taylor wool thrift store find  has this. I know my mom, who learned to sew on a straight stitch only machine will increase the seam allowance if she doesnt plan to finish the edges. One other option is what she calls "stitching in the ditch" which is where you iron the seam to one side, and then sew over it at like a millimeter offset to hold the seam in place and together. Pinking shears are another thing she does for unfinished wide seam allowances to prevent a thread from catching and pulling.

I really like that shirt, and am hoping it goes well, so I can buy a copy of the pattern!

If it was me, I would probably do the pinking shear version for now, to see how the fit is, then a fancier version if you later decide to make the pattern again.
 
Joylynn Hardesty
steward
Posts: 2965
Location: Officially Zone 7b, according to personal obsevations I live in 7a, SW Tennessee
1081
forest garden foraging books food preservation cooking fiber arts bee medical herbs
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I think bias bound seams are too bulky for princess seams. I have done it. I looked like I was deformed.
 
Carla Burke
gardener
Posts: 1656
592
personal care gear foraging hunting rabbit chicken cooking food preservation fiber arts medical herbs homestead
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I think bias bound would be too bulky, for princess seams...
 
gardener
Posts: 2998
Location: Pacific Wet Coast
1090
duck books chicken cooking food preservation ungarbage
  • Likes 5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Re: No Back Stitch I've done this - I leave the threads long enough at the start and the end and just tie a simple knot (like a square knot and a half) between the two threads and them trim them. Yes, it's a little fiddlier than a simple back stitch but it looks really nice. I'll take a couple of pictures if that doesn't make sense.
 
r ranson
master steward & author
Posts: 20422
Location: Left Coast Canada
5662
books chicken cooking fiber arts sheep writing
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
this is going to take a while
15970698176045497609961263718266.jpg
pattern
pattern
 
Jay Angler
gardener
Posts: 2998
Location: Pacific Wet Coast
1090
duck books chicken cooking food preservation ungarbage
  • Likes 6
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Important to someone new to patterns! The little triangular "chicken pecks" in the edge of patterns are for matching one piece to its mate. I was taught that cutting them inward as the pattern shows will weaken the seam, so I always draw them outward and cut them as little triangular "tabs". If there's a reason for not drawing and cutting them outwards, I'd use tailor's chalk, transfer paper, or thread to mark the spots. I also always added my own to the spot where a sleeve was to mate with the shoulder seam as that made it easier to ease and fit a sleeve. On some of those curves, you will end up having to cut the fabric so the seam will lay flat, but I do that as a straight cut, not a chicken peck.
 
r ranson
master steward & author
Posts: 20422
Location: Left Coast Canada
5662
books chicken cooking fiber arts sheep writing
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Wow, this taping everything together is taking FOREVER!

Now I ran out of clear tape.  That's a lot more plastic than I really want to interact with.  

Next time, I'm going to find out what the Canadian equivalent of a "copy shop" is so I can get this printed on big sheets of paper.  The pattern has that option.  
 
Jay Angler
gardener
Posts: 2998
Location: Pacific Wet Coast
1090
duck books chicken cooking food preservation ungarbage
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

r ranson wrote:Now I ran out of clear tape.  That's a lot more plastic than I really want to interact with.

Have you considered pinning the pieces together? Or possibly hand sewing them? Maybe making a little slice where pieces overlap and sliding a paper clip in - that might be wigglier than the first two ideas. A glue stick? Glue sticks are expensive for the volume, and maybe not much less plastic when you compare to tape.
 
Carla Burke
gardener
Posts: 1656
592
personal care gear foraging hunting rabbit chicken cooking food preservation fiber arts medical herbs homestead
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I've been known to glue them together...
 
r ranson
master steward & author
Posts: 20422
Location: Left Coast Canada
5662
books chicken cooking fiber arts sheep writing
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
This last week, I did exactly the behaviour that makes my back hurt (isn't scoliosis fun) so I've been looking for ways to save my back some pain.

Here's a solution I learned from my mentor - bed raisers.
make-table-taller-to-reduce-back-pain.jpg
make table taller to reduce back pain
make table taller to reduce back pain
 
Pearl Sutton
steward & bricolagier
Posts: 5828
Location: SW Missouri
2592
goat cat fungi books chicken earthworks food preservation cooking building homestead ungarbage
  • Likes 7
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
R: when you get the pattern put together how you want it, cut it out without any cloth involved, then trace it onto big paper. I buy cheap rolls of Christmas paper after the holidays, I actually pick designs that have things like a grid type design so I can work with my patterns easier. As you make the pattern, anything you had to modify, mark it on the big sheet also. When your shirt is done, anything you wish was a bit tighter or looser, mark it. You'll end up with an easier to deal with, easy to reuse pattern. and can use that one to make a good clean copy on wrapping paper. If you have brown paper, that works too, I don't stock that, I stock wrapping paper and old blueprints.

And I'm late to the discussion, but I sew a lot of princess line tops for myself, and I always iron the seams down well (away from the front of the shirt, toward the sides) clip a lot of little lines so it lays down really flat, and then put another line of stitching about 1/8 inch off the first one. That might be what people are telling you the name of, I don't know what that would be called. But if you iron it in well before sewing, use starch if you need to, it's very effective on princess lines.  

I'm with whoever said seam binding is too thick for a shirt. Might be excellent on the side seams, but not the curved ones on front. It doesn't lay flat on curves well. Still would end up having to stitch it down, plus now it's more layers.

Does your pattern tell you to make a test shirt first? Personally, if I were teaching you to do this, I'd have you do the main seams on crap fabric (I'm a fan of old sheets from thrift stores) and get the feel of what you are doing, and what's working and why, before you cut expensive cloth and make errors. You don't totally finish off a test one, just the parts you need to learn. And if you start running into issues on part of it you didn't do when sewing the real one, go back to your tester, and do it there first. I prefer to make my mistakes on cheap fabric. I tend to like batiks, and that fabric tends to run 12- 15.00 a yard. I don't make my mistakes on that!  

I'm glad you are learning this! It's hardest on your first one, that's part of why I do testers, after that it will not be so much effort and it will be fun.

:D
 
Carla Burke
gardener
Posts: 1656
592
personal care gear foraging hunting rabbit chicken cooking food preservation fiber arts medical herbs homestead
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I have to agree with Pearl. Making a 'muslin' - a first, cloth draft- of any garment is always helpful. Using an old sheet even works, and now, I have knit sheets AND woven ones, to use, depending on which type of fabrics I'm using, in the final garment. Another cool thing about using a muslin, is that it's made with basting stitches. So you can make adjustments, then when you're satisfied with all the adjustments, you can take it apart, and trace it onto the paper, to save, then use the muslin as the pattern. Then, when that muslin eventually features, you still have the paper version, waiting in the wings.
 
master pollinator
Posts: 1439
Location: Meppel (Drenthe, the Netherlands)
445
hugelkultur dog forest garden urban cooking bike
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Pearl Sutton wrote:...


I totally agree with all Pearl said. About making a test-blouse out of old sheets first to find out where and how you have to change the pattern.
And about ironing the princess seams flat and then stitching through.

I thank you, Pearl, for the idea of using (old) wrapping paper. Until now I always bought the special paper for patterns (kind of transparent with a grid print), but of course that's expensive.
 
r ranson
master steward & author
Posts: 20422
Location: Left Coast Canada
5662
books chicken cooking fiber arts sheep writing
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I just finished ironing my test fabric
 
Jay Angler
gardener
Posts: 2998
Location: Pacific Wet Coast
1090
duck books chicken cooking food preservation ungarbage
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I want to back up a little to what r ranson wrote here:

This last week, I did exactly the behaviour that makes my back hurt (isn't scoliosis fun) so I've been looking for ways to save my back some pain.

Here's a solution I learned from my mentor - bed raisers.

Yes, yes and yes! Not just for people with back pain! Working at a healthy height keeps your back and shoulders healthy longer as humans are seriously under-engineered in both those areas. "Bed raisers" are easy to make in various shapes and sizes and short ones may be useable with chairs as well as tables and beds. If I need to sit at a table for a big chopping task I will use a bar stool to get my shoulders in a better position.

There are other threads here on permies with ideas of coping or preventing back pain, but I wanted to insert this here to encourage people to think about back safety and go looking! Homesteading can improve people's health through fresh air, exercise and healthy food, but there are risks as well and being respectful on one's body is important.
 
r ranson
master steward & author
Posts: 20422
Location: Left Coast Canada
5662
books chicken cooking fiber arts sheep writing
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
tracing paper and mockup fabric.
frequent rests to help my back
1597531563860204461781673299034.jpg
pinning
pinning
 
Carla Burke
gardener
Posts: 1656
592
personal care gear foraging hunting rabbit chicken cooking food preservation fiber arts medical herbs homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
R, where do you draw, trace, cut, etc? Are you working on the floor, on a table, or something else?
 
r ranson
master steward & author
Posts: 20422
Location: Left Coast Canada
5662
books chicken cooking fiber arts sheep writing
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
table with the hight enhanced
 
Carla Burke
gardener
Posts: 1656
592
personal care gear foraging hunting rabbit chicken cooking food preservation fiber arts medical herbs homestead
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Ah, ok. That makes sense. One of my issues is that with the weird combination of my injuries and disabilities, I struggle staying in the same position - lying down, standing, sitting - in any one way for more than 10 or 15 minutes, leaves me so stiff and sore that a 10 second walk to the bathroom becomes a 3 minute hobbling ordeal. By the time I'm ready to head back, I'm moving along just fine, again, and no one knows my pain level, but me. Sitting on the floor pretty much doubles the effort, pain time, etc, because it adds so much to the 'getting up' part. On a really good day, you might not notice any of the struggle, if you didn't know what to look for. On a really bad day, you might wonder how I function, at all.
 
r ranson
master steward & author
Posts: 20422
Location: Left Coast Canada
5662
books chicken cooking fiber arts sheep writing
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Things I'm learning today.

- Princess seams are not hard at all.  Easier than darts!
- This might be because I have such fine control on my treadle machine - I can go as fast or as slow as I want and both hands are free to manipulate the cloth.
- I wonder if my pins are dull.  Should one need a thimble to push a pin through two layers of cotton?  
- My iron is too hot.   It just has numbers on it and goes up to 6 (steam comes out at 4-6).  I had hoped that 5 or 6 might be cotton, but it took 3 seconds to scorch the cloth.  So sewing this mock-up is helping me learn this iron as well as the techniques.
- Now I've finished the front, I'm extremely worried I chose the wrong size.  I did what the instructions said and choose by my measurements, which put me in the middle cup size for this shirt.  I'll keep going, but...
- That's a lot of work for a mockup.  And I'll probably have to do another one or two before I get it right.  sigh.

Seam finishing.

I tried some different methods on my front princess seams.   I'm leaning towards the enclosed seam, but I'm not sure yet which I like best.  
seam-finish-small-one.JPG
right: pinked | left: press to one side and top stitch (raw edge still there)
left: pinked | right: press to one side and top stitch (raw edge still there)
seam-small-two.JPG
left: enclosed seam | right: raw seam pressed open
left: enclosed seam | right: raw seam pressed open
 
r ranson
master steward & author
Posts: 20422
Location: Left Coast Canada
5662
books chicken cooking fiber arts sheep writing
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I also got the good cloth ready.  First I hem the edges with my small hemmer foot, then I stick it in the washing machine.  This time I decided to iron while still damp (instead of after it dries) and it made a much better result.  

Wish there was an easier way to iron big sections of cloth.
hem-small.JPG
hemmer foot
hemmer foot
 
Joylynn Hardesty
steward
Posts: 2965
Location: Officially Zone 7b, according to personal obsevations I live in 7a, SW Tennessee
1081
forest garden foraging books food preservation cooking fiber arts bee medical herbs
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Oh, but there is! 😁

Make a "ironing board cover" to fit your table. All you need is a piece of the below fabric just enough (4 Inches all around?) larger than your table to insert a drawstring. Put this over a  layer of cotton quilting batting. If your table is plastic, two layers of batting may be needed. Pull the drawstring tight, so that the drawstring snugs the cover fabric down underneath the edges of the table. Voila!

Oh. Plastic tables usually have wide edges. So be sure to allow enough fabric to cover this as well.

https://burlapfabric.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&products_id=2118&gclid=EAIaIQobChMI0tKWgf-g6wIVg-iGCh0z8w6hEAQYASABEgJTX_D_BwE

https://www.fabric.com/buy/0361359/warm-natural-cotton-45-batting-by-the-yard

Of course, if you are much more careful than I am, a sheet sewn with a drawstring to cover the batting might be sufficient.
 
Doe, a deer, a female deer. Ray, a pockeful of sun. Me, a name, I call my tiny ad ...
Rocket Mass Heater Plans - now free for a while
https://permies.com/goodies/7/rmhplans
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic