• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • r ranson
  • Anne Miller
  • Pearl Sutton
  • Mike Haasl
stewards:
  • paul wheaton
  • Joylynn Hardesty
  • Dave Burton
master gardeners:
  • jordan barton
  • Greg Martin
  • Steve Thorn
gardeners:
  • Carla Burke
  • Jay Angler
  • Kate Downham

Feral queen without swarm?

 
Posts: 52
Location: Oregon
6
forest garden foraging homestead
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Do feral queens ever venture out of the hive outside the context of a swarm? Maybe ousted from her hive? I swear I saw a bee on one of my corn stalks that was too big to be a regular worker, but she disappeared before I could grab my phone or anything to put her in. I was hoping I could get her to take up residence in a hive I wasn't able to get bees for (or bait). Maybe it was just an especially large worker, but I was hoping someone more experienced could shed some light.
 
pollinator
Posts: 3103
Location: Massachusetts, Zone:6/7, AHS:4, Rainfall:48in even Soil:SandyLoam pH6 Flat
307
forest garden solar
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
In addition to worker bees and queen bees, there is also drones.
Not all bees are honey bee, there is over 16,000 different species of bees, so its very possible that you saw another bee species.
 
pollinator
Posts: 295
Location: Southern Germany
124
kids books urban chicken cooking food preservation fiber arts bee
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Or possibly it was a queen on her way back from the mating place and was exhausted?
Hard to tell if there is no picture.
 
gardener & hugelmaster
Posts: 1862
Location: mountains of Tennessee
718
cattle hugelkultur cat dog trees hunting chicken bee homestead ungarbage
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Extremely unlikely it was a queen. They don't leave except for one mating flight when they're young or with a swarm when they're older. Even if it was a queen she wouldn't survive very long without attendant bees. Probably for the best that you weren't able to capture it.
 
master pollinator
Posts: 1536
Location: southern Illinois.
302
composting toilet food preservation homestead
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Although I have worked with bees for years,  I am a long way from being a expert. It is my understanding that rejected queens are normally killed off.  
 
Posts: 703
22
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
there is lots of great info on the internet on how to get wild bees into a box for domestication, basically build trap boxes and bait them with a drop or 2 of lemongrass oil and hang them up around an area where you see bees working
 
We've gotta get close enough to that helmet to pull the choke on it's engine and flood his mind! Or, we could just read this tiny ad:
BWB second printing, pre-order dealio (poor man's poll)
https://permies.com/t/147624/BWB-printing-pre-order-dealio
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic