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Long Load #2

 
gardener
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Location: latitude 47 N.W. montana zone 6A
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Hi all;   Heard a truck coming down the road this morning.
Turned out to be my second load of fire wood!
This load is all for next year.  I'll neaten up the logs and trim the ends in some.
Then a big tarp for the winter will keep it nice and dry.

Early next spring I'll be able to start cutting while its still cold in the mornings!  
How sweet it is!
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Long Load #2
Long Load #2
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Long Load #2
Long Load #2
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Long load #2
Long load #2
 
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I'm jealous, how much did that cost you if you don't mind me asking. just today I  was saying to my neighbor just today I need to cut a couple trees down so they start drying out for winter.
 
thomas rubino
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Hi Bruce;
Don't mind a bit.  $900 cash.  
If I had used a check it would have been $1000
 
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I spy quite the antique truck collection in the distance!  I know nothing at all about old trucks, but my partner has a ‘48 Power Wagon and a Ford 8N tractor of a similar vintage.

He does all the work on them himself, and declares that his antiques are better in every way than the expensive modern versions.

I actually have nothing to add to your post, except blathering on. And your firewood is lovely!
 
thomas rubino
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Hi Annie;  
Your partner is correct, the old vehicles when in good working order are way superior to anything new. With the possible exception of braking and fuel mileage.
Your seeing a running 1939 chevy dump truck,   a non running 1971 ford 3/4 and a running 1953 chevy 1 ton long bed pickup and  a 1968 impala SS  
 
bruce Fine
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just wondering, how did you get logs off of truck
 
thomas rubino
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Hi Bruce;  Around here most log trucks have a self loader.   He pulled up in the road. Unchained the load. Turned on his PTO , climbed in the upper seat set the outriggers down  and in twenty minutes it was all on the ground.   Pretty slick huh!
 
bruce Fine
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yeah, sure is slick, around here at the edge of the smokies, the most common log trucks are in 10 wheelers, to get down the narrow winding roads, I once asked a local driver how much for a load delivered to the house and he said it was all about what kind of trees.
very interesting prospect indeed. It seems I can never get enough dry firewood in winter and my high efficiency stove does not burn damp wood.
 
thomas rubino
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Yes prices vary here as well.   The wood I get was cut green the year before and set in decks all winter. They are tops.
So part of the load will be bone dry and part will be green. By cutting splitting and stacking it all as soon as I can, it is all bone dry before season.

I've seen long loads of what we call buckskin tamarack  (western larch, old growth, bark less) claiming to have 15 cords  (I doubt it) selling for $1500  (Crazy unless there really is 15 cord there)

As far as log trucks, they tend to use the dolly as then they can haul long or short loads.  Some smaller outfits just haul the short loads with fixed bunks.
 
thomas rubino
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A few logs to clean up.
And one 30' x 20' H.D. tarp later ... we are ready for snow!
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