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Anyone knows what my garlic is growing here? Bulbils!

 
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One of my garlic plants is growing this. Anyone knows what this is?
IMG_0144.jpeg
[Thumbnail for IMG_0144.jpeg]
 
pollinator
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Is that elephant garlic? Elephant and some others can spread by seed.
 
Ben Knofe
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I don't think so. The variety is either "Clédor" or "Germidour". Can't remember exactly.
 
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That part of the plant is called a "Bulbils".

They can be planted and make new plants.

Here is an article to tell you how:

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/herbs/garlic/garlic-plant-bulbils.htm
 
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Congratulations. You now have some baby garlic!
 
Ben Knofe
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Anne Miller wrote:That part of the plant is called a "Bulbils".

They can be planted and make new plants.

Here is an article to tell you how:

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/herbs/garlic/garlic-plant-bulbils.htm


Wow! Thanks for the link! Do you know if I can plant these in autumn? The article does not specify that.
 
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Hey, cool! Now I know the word too! I was weeding in a bed I lost control of and saw these weird clumps of something on the ground, breaking apart... They weren't eggs of anything, so I tasted one, garlic!! Awesome! I spread them around!
 
Pearl Sutton
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Ben Knofe wrote:
Wow! Thanks for the link! Do you know if I can plant these in autumn? The article does not specify that.


Well, mine are planting themselves right now, so probably :D
 
Anne Miller
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I would feel it would be okay to plant now. Especially that now is planting time for garlic in fall gardens.

I don't have experience with garlic, only walking onions.

As Pearl said, they will plant themselves.  Eventually, the stalk will bend down and the bublis plant themselves.
 
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Garlic "bulbils" will take longer to grow up to be large garlic. The "wisdom" is that the larger a garlic clove you plant, the larger garlic "bulb" will result and the cloves inside that bulb will also be larger.

That said, bigger is not always better. I have some lovely large garlic and I bake it, dry it, and use if for all sorts of things, but it's not nearly as potent as some of the small garlic I've used.

Separating the bulbils and planting with some space between them will help them grow bigger faster, but I've also used these bulbils to plant where I'm happy to have the "scent" while they grow for several years, like around my miniature rose which was prone to aphids and deer browse.
 
pollinator
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Plant them now vs later in the season.
 
pollinator
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In some varieties of garlic, if you pry those out right after they show up, you'll find undeveloped flowers underneath. With the bulbils removed, the flowers have room to develope and make seeds. I hear that not all garlics do this, but I only have Chesnok Red, which does.

On the other hand, in the future, removing the stem those bulbils form on (the scape) is said to let your bulb grow larger.
 
Ben Knofe
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I cut them off now and let them dry as a whole. Good/Bad idea?
 
T Melville
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Ben Knofe wrote:I cut them off now and let them dry as a whole. Good/Bad idea?



I think that depends on what your goal is. I don't know your climate well, but considering the latitude, it's probably too late for cutting off the scape to help your bulb size. It may be too late for removing the bulbils to allow flower / seed development, but at any rate you probably won't get seeds by leaving the bulbils on the scape. That leaves planting the bulbils or using them in the kitchen. Those are both still options, but I wouldn't let them dry too much. Mine seem to produce better planted in the fall. If I store them through winter, I think some or all of them die. With better storage, they'd probably keep until spring, but planting immediately is easier for me. For kitchen use, I'd expect them to be best used fresh. A few weeks or months, (refridgerated) maybe.
 
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