• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • r ranson
  • Anne Miller
  • Pearl Sutton
  • Mike Haasl
stewards:
  • paul wheaton
  • Joylynn Hardesty
  • Dave Burton
master gardeners:
  • jordan barton
  • Greg Martin
  • Steve Thorn
gardeners:
  • Carla Burke
  • Jay Angler
  • Kate Downham

Please, tell me why...

 
Posts: 42
Location: Limburg, Flanders, Belgium
28
  • Likes 7
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
...I thought I would need 9 (nine!) zucchini plants. I am the only one in this house who eats them (although I hide them in lots of dishes to get my kid to eat some too. He says he doesn't like zucchini - I don't think he knows how many he has eaten in his life).

I have harvested 73 so far - and while some plants are peaking, others are just beginning to yield. We might make it to 150 - who knows?

Next year I'll just have two plants like a normal person...
20200801_124149.jpg
[Thumbnail for 20200801_124149.jpg]
 
master pollinator
Posts: 1542
Location: southern Illinois.
302
composting toilet food preservation homestead
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
This is your big chance to make friends with all of your neighbors.
 
Sanna Heijnis
Posts: 42
Location: Limburg, Flanders, Belgium
28
  • Likes 5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

John F Dean wrote:This is your big chance to make friends with all of your neighbors.



Been working on that. Some of my neighbors have started to avoid me. I send my kid over with the zukes now - can't say no to a cute whiteheaded longhaired barefoot 7 year old boy!
 
Posts: 7600
Location: Ozarks zone 7 alluvial,black,deep clay/loam with few rocks, wonderful creek bottom!
1444
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I never grow them because they just appear if you let anyone know that you like them.

Years ago the joke was to be sure and lock your car during zucchini season.  At the time hardly anyone here locked and many left the keys in, including us.
 
John F Dean
master pollinator
Posts: 1542
Location: southern Illinois.
302
composting toilet food preservation homestead
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
This may be the time to change strategies...  who do you dislike?!!
 
pollinator
Posts: 338
Location: Western Kentucky
119
dog gear foraging trees hunting food preservation cooking fiber arts woodworking wood heat rocket stoves
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I planted more than nine, and have gotten two, and at this point it doesn't look promising to get any more. Never be afraid to plant too many, because there's no limit to how many nature can kill.
 
Sanna Heijnis
Posts: 42
Location: Limburg, Flanders, Belgium
28
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Jordan, that is exactly why I planted nine. Lost many to slugs and ildew or heat and drought before. Guess I got
lucky this year!
 
Jordan Holland
pollinator
Posts: 338
Location: Western Kentucky
119
dog gear foraging trees hunting food preservation cooking fiber arts woodworking wood heat rocket stoves
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Sanna Heijnis wrote:Jordan, that is exactly why I planted nine. Lost many to slugs and ildew or heat and drought before. Guess I got
lucky this year!



It's feast or famine! (Literally, I guess here)
 
master pollinator
Posts: 516
Location: Canadian Prairies - Zone 3b
120
  • Likes 6
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Excellent in stir fry if you pick them small.

My wife makes awesome zucchini muffins and chocolate zucchini cake.

You can grate them and freeze in small portions for baking in winter.

I know a Haitian chef who grates them, mixes them with flour and spices, makes patties and fries them. Incredible with hot sauce! You'd never know you're eating zucchini.
 
Sanna Heijnis
Posts: 42
Location: Limburg, Flanders, Belgium
28
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Those are great ideas Douglas, thanks!
 
Posts: 62
20
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Ditto the freezing comment. Grated for baking and sliced or chopped for other dishes. In my experience they freeze well.
 
Posts: 370
Location: St. George, UT. Zone 8a Dry/arid. 8" of rain in a good year.
101
trees bike greening the desert
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
My two dogs eat as much as I do when I have them coming in.  I mix in raw eggs with shell, and half their normal dry dog food to get them to eat it.  Edit, I dice it up into small cubes like potatoes.  

Then the chickens get even more and turn it into compost for an even better harvest next year.....
 
Posts: 20
Location: Pensacola, Fla zone 8b
2
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Lord have mercy, Sanna! I wish I had your luck with zucchini. Down here in Florida I plant 6 every month just to get a few fruit. Squash vine borer and squash bugs do a number on my plants so I constantly have to pull old ones and replant.
 
pollinator
Posts: 1248
Location: Denmark 57N
347
fungi foraging trees cooking food preservation
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Ha ha I have 20 plants and have had 78 from them so you're doing pretty well! I need more so next year will be 30 plants. I do sell them though. In fact I don't like them myself at all.
 
Sanna Heijnis
Posts: 42
Location: Limburg, Flanders, Belgium
28
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Oh my G, Skandi! That is a lot of plants!

Thomas Black wrote:Lord have mercy, Sanna! I wish I had your luck with zucchini. Down here in Florida I plant 6 every month just to get a few fruit. Squash vine borer and squash bugs do a number on my plants so I constantly have to pull old ones and replant.



I will just count my blessings then :-)

Got to work on some patties for dinner, they were awesome and easy to make and I ate a whole zucchini all by myself, so that's a keeper!
20200801_182434.jpg
[Thumbnail for 20200801_182434.jpg]
 
Thomas Black
Posts: 20
Location: Pensacola, Fla zone 8b
2
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
WOW!!! I can almost smell those patties!
 
pollinator
Posts: 313
Location: Yukon Territory, Canada. Zone 1a
71
transportation hugelkultur cat books cooking food preservation bike building writing rocket stoves wood heat
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
When I lived further south, there was a saying:
"An uninvited zucchini gift is an act of terrorism."
A drive-by drop-and-run on someone's from porch was referred to as a zuclear bomb.

Now that I live up where they only grow if seriously babied, I would take all your excess zukes!
 
pollinator
Posts: 304
108
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
They make great pickles, just use in place of cucumbers in any pickle recipe.

I like to grow dual-purpose squash, for exactly the reasons you describe. That way if I can't keep up with the zucchini, I can just let them keep ripening to use as winter squash.
 
Posts: 703
22
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
zucchini ---very yummy--- can be used to make all kinds of stuff-- zucchini bread anyone-- boiled with onions, batter fried, I like it best when cooked like this, brown a large onion in butter add some pepper, slice zucchini thin and fill the pan, fold it together, you can add some fresh garlic if you like, add some more butter on top and cover pan till zucchini is steamed soft, remove lid and keep cooking slowly to reduce moisture, --eat with rice or potatoes or just by itself.
 
bruce Fine
Posts: 703
22
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
if no one else will eat that sautéed zucchini recipe I just posted, they better get their taste buds tested

here's a couple I'll share from the The Fine Farm Cookbook

IMG_2173.jpeg
[Thumbnail for IMG_2173.jpeg]
 
Douglas Alpenstock
master pollinator
Posts: 516
Location: Canadian Prairies - Zone 3b
120
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I am told that zucchini can be substituted for apples in apple pie. I am skeptical, but I know the piemaker well. Apparently it's all in the spices. I've also been told that carrots can be substituted for pumpkin in pumpkin pie. Sacrilege! But then again maybe not.
 
No holds barred. And no bars holed. Except this tiny ad:
Greenhouse of the Future ebook - now free for a while
https://permies.com/goodies/greenhouse
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic