• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • r ranson
  • Anne Miller
  • Pearl Sutton
  • Mike Haasl
stewards:
  • paul wheaton
  • Joylynn Hardesty
  • Dave Burton
master gardeners:
  • jordan barton
  • Greg Martin
  • Steve Thorn
gardeners:
  • Carla Burke
  • Jay Angler
  • Kate Downham

Old sickle care

 
pollinator
Posts: 156
Location: Rutland VT
31
dog forest garden foraging trees bike homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
  I love using hand tools around the yard.  It is so quiet and close compared to battery or as tools.  HOWEVER with all the use my wooden handle has been drying up and splitting along the grain.  Ive tried soaking it in watered down glue, wrapping it with P-cord. . .nothing seems to keep the handle secure anymore.

    Is there a point where a handle just cant be salvaged, how does one go about making a new wooden handle for an old blade, its got about a 2" tang. I love my sickle, but dont love blood blisters.


- Pancake
 
pollinator
Posts: 375
Location: Central Texas zone 8a, 800 chill hours 28 blessed inches of rain
53
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Brian Jeffrey wrote:     Is there a point where a handle just cant be salvaged, how does one go about making a new wooden handle for an old blade, its got about a 2" tang. I love my sickle, but dont love blood blisters.
- Pancake



Yes, handle can reach a point of no return.  Then it is a matter of time before they deteriorate to failure.  The key to long handle life is keep them protected and nourished, even dead wood needs to have moisture replaced.  Boiled linseed oil applied liberally over several coats on a new handle.  A little furniture wax once in a while if you don't want to reseason the wood.  Your old handle may still benefit from linseed oil; but it if has longitudnal checking, it may be too far gone to save, (although servicable for a while longer.)

VT has good hardwood lumber, especially hickory.  One can purchase a new shovel or axe handle and modify it to the shape/size you wish.  Any good hardware store will have hickory replacement handles.  A spokeshave is the traditional tool to use to reshape a wooden handle.  A draw knife will work as well.  As far as the tang, one might have to drill out the hole to the right depth, undersized for the tang; then bring it in with a riffle file or rasp for good fit.



spoke shaves can be straight blade or convace as above.  Concaves are nice but rather static to the radius it will cut.  A flat blade works fine, just takes more passes to round the handle.



A draw knife is what I would use, since I know how it cuts in my hands.  Finish up with some coarse then fine sand paper when you have the shape you want.  

Quick guide on caring for wooden handles with linseed oil

Be very careful however!  The first time you pick up a drawknife, one can find themselves addicted very quickly.  Enjoy.

 
gift
 
The Greenhouse of the Future ebook by Francis Gendron
will be released to subscribers in: soon!
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic