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Going to try haskap/honeyberry

 
pollinator
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Location: Ashhurst New Zealand
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I just scored fifty honeyberry (haskap) plants as part of a field trial program by our tree crop association. I think my plan is to plant them out in three or four blocks in different parts of the property, to see how they do with soil types and exposure. Anyone with tips or tricks, or should I just put them in the ground, mulch them and stand back?
 
pollinator
Posts: 313
Location: Yukon Territory, Canada. Zone 1a
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They grow well where I am, so they are very cold tolerant. That being said, they don't love high heat during flowering.
Plant in blocks, as there are male/female plants and you need 1 male for every 5 female- I don't know how to tell until berries appear.
Bees help if you have them (I know NZ has lots of apiaries), but wind, ants, and mosquitoes will pollinate as well.
They like slightly acid soil, are somewhat drought tolerant, and yes they enjoy a good top dress of compost mulch.
Good luck!
 
Phil Stevens
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Location: Ashhurst New Zealand
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Thanks for that info Chris. I think we have all the boxes ticked...soil here is mildly acidic, we dry out in the summer and early autumn, and it hardly ever reaches 30 degrees. Spring is mild here, maybe 20 tops and goes from August until December :-)

Bees are abundant and they are out year round. I saw dozens today as I was in the garden, so pollination should be sussed. I will plant blocks of 12-15 so that should take care of the sex distribution. The plants are all seedlings and could have some interesting genetics....
 
Chris Sturgeon
pollinator
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Location: Yukon Territory, Canada. Zone 1a
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I spent 6 months wwoofing and traveling in NZ, where is Ashurst?
 
Phil Stevens
pollinator
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Just a cooee away from Palmerston North. Two hours north of Wellington and right next to the Manawatu Gorge.
 
Chris Sturgeon
pollinator
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Location: Yukon Territory, Canada. Zone 1a
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Oh yeah, the gorge is beautiful, I didn't get to your side of it because the road was shut down, but I enjoyed a hike on the East side of the divide...

If you make enough berries be sure to contact Jesse from 'Still It'. He lives in Palm North. He has a great YouTube channel on home distilling.

Cheers!
 
Phil Stevens
pollinator
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That highway has been abandoned since the 2017 slip. They're going to reroute it over the divide just above our village. But it's a great walk now and already being reclaimed by nature....My son and I went up the Apiti Track out behind Norsewood a few weeks ago and got some nice views before the clouds rolled back in.

Thanks for the tip on distilling and I'll look up Jesse. Maybe he can help with my feijoa glut next autumn (although we made massive amounts of fruit leather this year and that has been awesome).
 
pollinator
Posts: 143
Location: Northwest Missouri
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I just started my permaculture garden last year and included 10 haskap plants. They are not thriving and I even had to replace a couple this spring. The problem, I believe, is that I did not develop the soil first. I amended the individual planting spots with compost and whatnot to sweeten them up, then mulched with wood chips. But now I'm feeling like I should have put more care into getting the poor soil built up into rich soil first, because that seems to be what they want. The goumie berries next to them are doing great, which is part of why I assume that haskaps just want a nice soil from the get-go.
 
pollinator
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Location: 4b
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Mine are doing great, but good luck getting to eat any before the birds get them all.
 
master pollinator
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Location: Canadian Prairies - Zone 3b
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Be prepared to share your haskaps with the birds. One for you, ten for them.
 
Phil Stevens
pollinator
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I've got over 100m of bird netting at the ready.
 
pollinator
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Location: Nevada, Mo 64772
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Matt Todd, I have two haskaps in western Missouri. They don’t like it here very much so far, but we are turning into a desert this summer. My yard has had big cracks in it for at least a month. I don’t think we’ve had a measurable amount rain in about eight weeks.

I’m watering a lot. My native spicebush and hazelnut shrubs are close to dying. I haven’t watered them yet because my other plants needed water more.  I will water them if we miss this next rain.
 
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I bought 80 honeyberries, two types, as 1” plugs this spring. They’re potted into one gallon pots for now. They’re too small to plant out for now, my bunnies and deer would ship them right down to the ground. So we’ll see. I’ll bring them in the garage over winter as gallon pots don’t offer much protection and voles will eat anything potted it seems. Hopefully next spring I can get them out and planted. The real deciding factor will be if I can tear up enough lawn to put them in.
 
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