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Is this a pecan, walnut or something else?

 
pollinator
Posts: 328
Location: Zone 8b Portland
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I’ve never grown walnuts so I have trouble identifying them. I wild tree showed up in the back corner of my property and I need some help from the awesome permies with identifying it 😁
My phone app seems to think it’s a pecan but I don’t think that’s right.
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pollinator
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Location: East tn
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Looks like a young black walnut. They grow fast and are generally useful. They do emit a substance to suppress competition which impacts what will grow near them. But the nuts are nutritious and store well. There are medicinal qualities as well.
 
pollinator
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Location: the mountains of western nc
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yup, looks like a walnut. you can pull a leaf off and crush it to get confirmation from the smell, but if you won't recognize the smell...that may not help. maybe for next time. walnut has a very distinct smell.
 
Chris Holcombe
pollinator
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Interesting tip about the smell. I’ll go out there and try it today. I told my neighbor if this is a walnut that explains why the two maple trees next to it died. I was back there cutting them down yesterday. Thanks for the help everyone!
 
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I thought I had a walnut tree, and about 5 years later, while I waited for it to finally start producing, it turned out to be a Chinese Flame tree, Koelreuteria Bipinnata.   It is very aggressive and can easily shade out trees near it because it has the potential to get to 60 feet/20 meters.  It does have elaborate sprays of beautiful flowers, but hundreds, if not thousands of seeds, with little new trees coming up underneath it by the dozens.  The honeybees love it, though.
 
pollinator
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Location: OK High Plains Prairie, 23" rain avg
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Cristo Balete, I'm on my phone and so it doesn't show where you're located. What climate are you in, and was this tree you're speaking of a fast-growing tree?

OP, perhaps you can take a leaf and you're a good photos to your extension agent and they can tell you what tree it is.
 
Chris Holcombe
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I crushed one of the leaves and it does have an interesting strange smell that I can’t describe
 
Cristo Balete
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denise ra wrote:Cristo Balete, I'm on my phone and so it doesn't show where you're located. What climate are you in, and was this tree you're speaking of a fast-growing tree?



Denise, I'm on the West Coast, mild winter climate.  The description for the Chinese Flame Trees says it can grow in Zones 7-9.  I think it could be a very invasive tree, considering the shocking number of little trees forming underneath it.  The description also says it can live 50-150 years.  It is a real commitment, not sure I'll keep it.  It's already up where it takes a ladder to trim it, even though it's been trimmed.

If you are looking for something that is manageable, makes a great hedge, and fixes nitrogen, and provides great leaf mulch, check out Elaeagnus, one without thorns.  The thorns are painful.  They are drought tolerant once established.  Haven't watered mine in 30 years.  Some have edible berries.
 
denise ra
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Cristo Balete, Our climates are very different, I'm semi-arid, presumably, something that is good in one climate may be bad in another. Every property owner ought to have some invasive species bookmarks for their area. On the surface, Elaeagnus sounds great but it is on my Invasive Species watchlist for my area. That in itself isn't the be-all-and-end-all, I can ask the local conservation district, the extension agent, and thoughtful neighbors what they have found in regards to Russian Olive and Autumn Olive which were the Elaeagnus species planted in this area in the past.
Autumn Olive: Good Intentions Gone Bad
 
Cristo Balete
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denise ra wrote: it is on my Invasive Species watchlist for my area. [/url]



Ah, well, then probably better not to try it.  In the 30 years I've had Elaeagnus silverberry I've never gotten a volunteer from it, but it has thorns so I wouldn't do it again.  Goumi berries are in the Elaeagnus family, and are a great berry.

Oddly enough, a native here, figwort, has gotten so invasive at my place it's dense and chest high, blocking out other natives, and is miserable to try to mow even with a walk-behind tractor mower.   I'm going to have to go at it with the string trimmer first, get it down to knee high, then go at it again with the tractor mower.  

 
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