• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • paul wheaton
  • Anne Miller
  • Pearl Sutton
  • Mike Haasl
  • Joylynn Hardesty
stewards:
  • r ranson
  • James Freyr
  • Burra Maluca
master gardeners:
  • Steve Thorn
  • Greg Martin
gardeners:
  • Ash Jackson
  • thomas rubino
  • Carla Burke

Critique my lawn/meadow/pasture plan?

 
pollinator
Posts: 468
Location: San Diego, California
87
forest garden trees rabbit chicken food preservation building woodworking greening the desert
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Alright, here's the situation and plan - please be as brutal as possible:

Southern California, zone 10a, no irrigation beyond manual watering/moving hose sprinkler heads - very little rainfall in summer/fall.
six percent grade hill of about half an acre with barely any topsoil and many, many pocket gophers (the hawks and owls are making good progress on these, but traps and pellet gun not successful - not doing poison.) No erosion problems.

Right now we have sparse patches of Bermuda grass and Alyssum self-seeding - which is good and we want to keep.  We also have pigweed, sow thistle, common mallow, purslane, and wood sorrel, all of which we'll manage by us or livestock eating them.  Several other spring grasses and minor weeds which are not much of an issue.

Problem Weeds: Black medic and foxtail grass seeds(not sure the species) keep getting stuck in our shoes/socks and are painful(especially for the kid, and dangerous for the dog's paws/nose)


The Plan: seed Bermuda grass, "palestine" strawberry clover, daikon radish, Buffalograss, chicory, and pasture-type Fava beans under fruit trees (where they'll get irrigation) next spring - get these established and hope that they spread as I slowly continue to put in more trees and irrigation areas.  I've also heard Bahia grass might be a good helper in my situation and may order some.

I plan to run chicken and rabbit tractors over these areas in the coming years, and maybe finish a spring lamb or two on it.



Can these handle some dry conditions with no topsoil and no amendments? is there a drought hardier grass that grows low to the ground and doesn't drop annoying seedheads?
 
gardener
Posts: 1153
Location: Longbranch, WA
194
goat tiny house rabbit wofati chicken solar
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
You need to mow undesirables before they set seed and if possible let the desirable set seed and spread that where needed.
get started with the chicken tractors as soon as possible.
 
Posts: 38
Location: Reeds Spring, MO; zone 6b Ozarks
12
homeschooling kids forest garden trees books writing
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Where I live (humid zone 6b forest), Bermuda grass can't be killed. In fact, it's my most problematic weed and I despise it utterly. It sends it stolons anywhere there's the last bit of soil or possibility of it—I have a timber retaining wall next to be driveway and there are Bermuda stolons stretching out at least 18 inches over straight concrete looking for dirt. So although I can't speak to how it would do in your climate, which is much drier than mine, I suspect it will be as tough as you'd want. Just be sure you actually want it, because it may be a bear to get rid of once it's in.
 
Dustin Rhodes
pollinator
Posts: 468
Location: San Diego, California
87
forest garden trees rabbit chicken food preservation building woodworking greening the desert
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thanks Matt - I have counted the cost and I think it's worth having (for me) all my important gardening areas are in raised beds on stilts(because of the gophers) so I think the wandering and establishing itself will actually be good for my otherwise completely bare soil.  
 
I'm doing laundry! Look how clean this tiny ad is:
100th Issue of Permaculture Magazine - now FREE for a while
https://permies.com/goodies/45/pmag
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic