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Name That Weed

 
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Assuming it is a weed... I have these cropping up in stands around my pasture (see attached). I thought they were milkweed but I'm not sure. Does anyone recognize this plant?
weed.jpg
name that weed
name that weed
 
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Milkweed is my guess. They should flower soon, so you can tell for sure.
 
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Certainly looks like milkweed. Most, but not all, exude a milky, sticky liquid when broken. They spread underground, as well as with their silky seeds that fly from the pods when they burst.
 
Bill Chepel
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I picked a pickup truck full of these out of the pasture today
 
Jordan Holland
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Bill Chepel wrote:I picked a pickup truck full of these out of the pasture today


Pick them when young and they are delicious (if you like green beans and asparagus).
 
Anne Pratt
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Bill Chepel wrote:I picked a pickup truck full of these out of the pasture today



They'll be back  . . .
 
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Jordan Holland wrote:

Bill Chepel wrote:I picked a pickup truck full of these out of the pasture today


Pick them when young and they are delicious (if you like green beans and asparagus).


And snap them off to get just the tender top sections of the shoots and they grow back beautifully for the next harvest.
 
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Milkweed does contain toxins though only if consumed in large quantities.  

I feel that most animals seem to know what not to eat.

 
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And the Monarch Butterflies literally can’t live without it. Each patch is a vital “fast food “ stop along the migration path. For great information the Journey North website is a wonderful source.
 
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Bill Chepel wrote:I picked a pickup truck full of these out of the pasture today



I hope you can use them for mulch somewhere. I'd love to have that much mulch in a day!
 
Bill Chepel
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edited reply - see below
 
Bill Chepel
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Bill Chepel wrote:Thank you for all the great replies. I did mix them into my mulch pile.

The problem I have with the milkweed is how it will be perceived by the local rancher who wants the hay from that field. I call it a pasture but there are no livestock on it. It has been a hayfield for years and farmed conventionally with synthetic fertilizer and broadleaf herbicides like dicamba and 2,4,D (we bought the place 6 months ago) to create a mulch hay for mushroom farms. There was never any thought given to regenerative agriculture and it shows in the soil tests (low organic matter). I've started the conversion to organic and quite honestly not sure how to create good organic hay. In late spring I did a light vertical till and overseeded using a no-till seed drill with organic seed (5 hay/pasture grasses, medium red clover, alsike clover and yellow mustard). I've stayed off it since but the weeds are popping up which was to be expected. Organic hay is going to be tough. My long term goal is good forage for livestock. Thanks again

 
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