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How to wash wool - a video

 
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a quick video about washing small amounts of wool

some more detailed instructions on my blog
 
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Wow, love it!  Really nice job on the video. You make it look easy, and great job stacking functions while doing it!

Have never heard of Orvus paste - I assume that is a brand of soap, or is it a specific type to washing wool?

 
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Artie Scott wrote:Have never heard of Orvus paste - I assume that is a brand of soap, or is it a specific type to washing wool?



Orvus paste is really interesting.  I first stumbled on it (someone left it on the ground) at the Fall Fair.  They use it to wash lambs before showing because it's extremely gentle and biodegradable.  It's also excellent for getting rid of protein stains (like sweat and poo).

AND my garden loves it!

It's extremely economical.  I usually use about one to two teaspoons per fleece (I did more for the video because I was nervous of the camera).  I've had this jug for about 8 years and it's almost half empty.  
 
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Looked like a plastic-less version of drip irrigation to me! I imagine that baby bean plant was happy to re-use the water.  

How long did you let the bag drain between rinses? Did you just set it on the metal side drain to do so, or actually hang the bag somewhere it could drip a while before the next rinse?
 
r ranson
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Jay Angler wrote:How long did you let the bag drain between rinses? Did you just set it on the metal side drain to do so, or actually hang the bag somewhere it could drip a while before the next rinse?



I usually just leave it until the water isn't pouring out or the next sink is full - whichever comes first.  
 
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The video is nice, and I don't want to take anything away from a good job but...

I have been washing fleeces for over 30 years and some seasons I've done 15 or more, keeping each seperate.
If you have regular wahing machine (the kind where the tub fills up with water) You can do a better job with less handling thusly:

Fill the tub with hot water and your choice of soap. More water and soap for larger or dirtier fleeces
with the washer turned to 'off' , gently press the fleece into the hot water
Leave it for a while, several hours is not too long. Don't leave it so long that the water gets cold.

with the washer lid open, move the control to 'spin' and close the lid
(you want water to spin out but no agitation)

lift out your fleece and wipe any dirt out of the washer drum

Usually I will do it a second time with only water. A coated fleece it may not need anything more.
The fleece is almost dry as is comes out of the machine and will quickly finish spread out anywhere.

In all the years doing this I've never clogged the machine or had any problems, the only caveat is that it uses a considerable amount of water.
 
r ranson
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Yes, the video is just the beginning to show how easy it can be to wash wool.

I posted some tips for washing larger quantities on my blog
https://www.crowinghen.ca/blog/how-to-wash-wool
 
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Great video makes it very easy for me ,also do you spin your own wool vicky
 
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I really enjoyed the video, r! It was exactly what I needed to see, especially since my washing machine is a front loader. We're on a grey water system, so the water would go right back to our plants outside, if I did use the washer - but, my goat's wool is angora, so I'm not sure I'd want to spin it, in the machine, anyway. It's my first season, and I haven't done anything with their fleeces, yet, because I was afraid I'd screw it up and ruin them. I guess I was just overcomplicating it, in my head - now, I can go ahead, with more confidence! Thank you!
 
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Hi

Sure enjoyed your video about washing wool!

I’ve done quite a bit of that myself. I used to have a spinning wheel and I want to get another one so I can spin some yarn. It’s very relaxing!!

Do you do fiber felting? That’s fun to do too!

What kind of sheep do you have?

Maybe you could share some of your knowledge of sheep and what it takes to raise them for wool and a pet!!


Sheep are one of my favorite animals!

Thank you for sharing 🐑
 
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