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What to clone / propagate this season?

 
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What’s everyone cloning / propagating this season?
I want to make clones of my Cornelian Cherry - so I have more to plant next year. I’ve heard you can softwood cuttings around this time of year- does anyone have experience with cloning this plant?

Also, I would like to make clones of my thriving schisandra berry vine- has anyone had experience with that?

Thanks all!
 
pollinator
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I'm currently trying to start cuttings of Fig, Elderberry, Mulberry, Pomegranate, and Pineapple Guava.
 
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Here in Uk, summer cuttings of Fuchsia bushes take well, I have the variety called globosa...the berries are prolific and cropping substantially after 3 years

 
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I am about 2 weeks away from starting my Texas star hibiscus' crepe myrtles (thin and broad leaved), and rose of sharon. I believe I will be doing magnolia cuttings soon as well.
 
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I'm making cuttings of nearly everything I have that I think will grow from them.  Honeyberry, siberian pea shrubs, sea berry, nine bark, autumn olive, josta berry, willow,...  Whatever I don't use in my food forest will be given away, or just planted in random areas of my land that have open places.  You can never have too many.
 
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I think the question is what are you not propagating!    I seem to have no self control when it comes to starting new plants.

I have about twenty-five goji berry cuttings growing at the back of the house where they are protected from mid-day sun.  Most have rooted but still not ready to be out in the open just yet.  From seed I have asparagus, rhubarb, chives, and garlic chives.  On the kitchen counter I keep shot glasses for rooting cuttings of peppermint, spearmint, sweet mint, basil, lemon balm and oregano (though not having much luck with it).  In the garden I have two window boxes filled with horseradish cuttings that resided in my fridge since 2018, rhubarb seedlings that I found in a container from 2016, peach tree seedlings and a weeping willow I propagated for a friend.  The cold frame contains chive divisions and seedlings planted a few months ago and some comfrey I pulled up for tea that had a bit of root attacked to the stalk.

What I still intend to propagate this year:  elderberry, antique roses, a double rose of Sharon that evidently doesn't produce viable seed, comfrey, currant, gooseberry, more rhubarb, asparagus, chives, garlic chives and mints.  The reason I'm propagating so much rhubarb, asparagus, chives and mints is because I'm planning on marketing these beginning next year.

Yeah, I may have a bit of a problem.  

 
pollinator
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I'm new to cloning/propegating my own plants, so this is the first time I've ever attempted it!

I'm trying to get Fig, Pecan, Roses and Rosemary to root.
I'm really annoyed with my rosemary to be honest; It self-roots out in the front bed all year long, but the minute I try to get some cutting to root, they decide to be stubborn jerks and rot/decay.
I've tried digging up some of the self-rooted starts out front to transplant them, but they just die on me too! I suspect my rosemary is having fun at my expense....

I've got 8 cuttings from a lovely Fig that I'm trying to root a couple different ways (direct to soil, root in water, with and without rooting powder) so we'll see which ones work.

Other than those I'm just sitting here wishing that my lovely veggies could be perennials instead of annuals....it would be so wonderful to not have to re-plant tomatoes every year!
 
pollinator
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Carolyne Castner wrote:I'm new to cloning/propegating my own plants, so this is the first time I've ever attempted it!

I'm really annoyed with my rosemary to be honest; It self-roots out in the front bed all year long, but the minute I try to get some cutting to root, they decide to be stubborn jerks and rot/decay.
I've tried digging up some of the self-rooted starts out front to transplant them, but they just die on me too! I suspect my rosemary is having fun at my expense....

I've got 8 cuttings from a lovely Fig that I'm trying to root a couple different ways (direct to soil, root in water, with and without rooting powder) so we'll see which ones work.


Don't overwater, fertilize or try to start the rosemary in special soil. Rosemary and oregano both do quite well with neglect.
 
Lauren Ritz
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I have american cranberry, nanking cherry, and serviceberry that I'll be trying to start, just for my own use. The serviceberry and cranberry seem to be dying and I can't figure out why.

I started penstemons, sage, and tarragon two weeks ago and the plants are now well established and mostly out in their permanent places. I need to do more oregano. Something ate my greenhouse oregano to the ground but hasn't touched anything else in there. For some reason marjoram never takes, although it seems to do fine in the hydroponics.
 
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I took cuttings of two types of willows and Prairie Poplar the have rooted nicely and will get planted out soon. I have dug up close to 300 tiny seedlings so far of Siberian Elm, Manitoba Maple, random Pines, Crab Apples, Lilac, Nanking cherry, Sea Buckthorn. I'm taking care of most of them but some get treated to the STUN. Method and so far the Elm and Nanking cherry are the clear winners with that method.

I'll be starting some Black Locust, Siberian pea shrub and possibly some Green Ash and more Manitoba Maple by seed right away once I get the spots prepared.
 
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I've started making more comfrey; a novice at propagation should start with something easy, right?

I want to multiply our fruit trees, but I need to learn how to do this, first.  What tree can be the base for a cutting from another?  Which part is called the scion?  A lot to learn.  Right now, working on seeds and seedlings!
 
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I'm trying Cherry and Maple trees, I did about 30 of each. I put them in sand over moss in a shady part of my lot. Going to split my comfrey just not sure when as well as horseradish. I did buy two apple, pear and pawpaws trees so going to try those in a couple years. I've had no luck with my cold germinated seeds but will try again.
SAVE_20200614_231117.jpg
Cherry & Maple whips
Cherry & Maple whips
 
Carolyne Castner
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Anne Pratt wrote:I've started making more comfrey; a novice at propagation should start with something easy, right?

I want to multiply our fruit trees, but I need to learn how to do this, first.  What tree can be the base for a cutting from another?  Which part is called the scion?  A lot to learn.  Right now, working on seeds and seedlings!



Scion wood is new growth on your tree. It will usually have a different color or texture from wood that is older. It should be the newest stuff on the tree, from the most recent growing season.
Look for small branches with a few buds, but without other twigs or branches coming off from it. When you strip everything off (leaves) it should look like a pretty boring straight stick.
 
Lauren Ritz
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Anne Pratt wrote:I've started making more comfrey; a novice at propagation should start with something easy, right?

I want to multiply our fruit trees, but I need to learn how to do this, first.  What tree can be the base for a cutting from another?  Which part is called the scion?  A lot to learn.  Right now, working on seeds and seedlings!

Scion is the top part of a grafted tree. This is the one that has your "named variety" fruit. Rootstock is the part the scion is grafted onto. Rootstock generally won't affect the fruit itself, but will affect bloom time, chill hours, etc.
 
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I'm propagating my fig tree, going to try one in a pot to bring into the basement for the winter, and see how that compares to the outdoor plant as far as getting fruit to ripen.

Also my forsythia propagated itself and I dug up the offspring and plant one in the front yard and gave another to a neighbor who is going to try it in a big pot on her patio.
 
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When pruning my hissop, I have put some of the removed stems into a pot with soil. Not sure if they will root.

I planted all sideshoots of my tomatoes that had a decent size into the soil right under the plant. I guess most will root.

And I crushed some white alpine strawberries into a little pot about two weeks ago and a lot of seedlings are coming up!

Today, I put two different mint sprigs into a glass of water in my kitchen.

Still on my to-do list: cuttings of my herbs (thyme, rosemary), roses, and the black raspberry (blackcap) which I had ordered this spring - in case it gets sturdy enough this year.
 
Carolyne Castner
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I picked up a little lavender plant this week and managed to drop the whole thing on the ground and break half the stems. Saved the broken stemps and cleaned/cut the ends; I've got them in water now to see if they'll root.
I got some babies off my passionflower vine and they rooted in water in about three days! They're in a pot now to get bigger
 
Carolyne Castner
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Ashley Mann wrote:I am about 2 weeks away from starting my Texas star hibiscus' crepe myrtles (thin and broad leaved), and rose of sharon. I believe I will be doing magnolia cuttings soon as well.



Which techniques are you using for the crepe’s and hibiscus? I have both and would love to propagate more
 
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