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I thought I would post a picture on the progress of my greenhouse. My first location I had for it had to be abandoned after a distance visit from my engineer father in law. End up that I had gone way too deep and I had basically dug a spot for a pool by making the foundation the lowest spot in our entire garden.  Moved to a second location, which I am liking better anyways.  The plexiglass roof is on now and I have to put more logs and cross bracing on before I mound the dirt I excavated around the north and west side of it.  There will be windows for venting heat in the top just above grade on the north side, and a patio for taking a break while gardening on the east side. I am still not sure about the colour of the plexiglass and how that will impact plants but it is what came free with it so I will give it a try this year. I started to insulate the cracks in the logs but ran out of foam, so that has to be completed as well.  
Any input or suggestions are greatly appreciated.
Regards
Brayden
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pollinator
Posts: 314
Location: Yukon Territory, Canada. Zone 1a
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Wow, looks fancy! Where did you get the curved plexi? It reminds me of the 80's design of Tim Horton's coffee shops.

I want to do something similar, but attached to the Southern aspect of my house. The house was built by the previous owner of the property when we bought it, and the builder had the roof and windows all facing East/West. Great view of the Lake, but no solar gain.

Do you plan on putting any thermal mass on the North wall?

 
Brayden Plummer
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Thanks Chris.  I got everything free form Kijji. A lady way renovating her house and wanted it gone.  It took my brother and I about 5 hours to dismantle it.  It is actually double walled, I just have not got that far with it yet.
The plan is to stack water barrels on the north wall and integrate them with either a solar hot water system or rocket mass stove for the winter.  I will post when I get to that phase. Too many other projects on the go at the moment.
Regards
Brayden  
 
pollinator
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Location: Beavercreek, OR
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Brayden - good work thus far!

I once had something like that but never did get it turned into a greenhouse before we had to move across the country.

There's a possible trap/land mine in your glass that you may not know about ... that glass is probably Low-E glass.  This is meant to minimize solar gain (by reflecting that particular wave length) and maximizing internal heat retention (by also reflecting that other wave length back in).  Some glasses will just reflect one of the wave lengths.  Thus the problem might be that you've got glass designed to reject solar energy  and hold on to supplemental heat generation.

Just ... beware.
 
steward
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So the logs on the north wall are being held back by the posts?  I'm hoping the posts are very firmly secured to the ground so they don't get pushed southward by the weight of the backfill?

Should be a neat greenhouse, more pics please!
 
Brayden Plummer
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The posts are 4 feet in concrete and backfilled with sand.  The earth is not going to be mounded heavily on the back wall.  I am going to push it up so there is a trench and then put more sand in right against the logs for better drainage.  The post are 8 inches thick and I am cross bracing to the other posts as well, so should be super solid.  That being said I will go slow and in layers while I am back filling.  I will post some more pictures as I go.
 
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