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What is this frilly-leaved plant?

 
pollinator
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Location: Hamburg, Germany
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While I'm asking dumb questions, what is this?  It appeared near where my Good King Henrys disappeared, but the leaves are wrong.  It's about 2 feet high - that's lady's mantle in the background for comparison.  And the edges are not quite so silvery in real life as in the photo.

It's quite pretty.  Is it useful?

unknown-plant.JPG
frilly plant
frilly plant
 
Mother Tree
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It looks like a member of the parsley and carrot family, which includes some highly poisonous plants as well as some useful and edible ones.



This page has some useful information.
 
Morfydd St. Clair
pollinator
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Indeed what I suspected.  Which is why I did NOT taste it.  I do have Botany in a Day - thank you for the reminder and I will look it up that way when I'm next at the garden!  Thank you!
 
pollinator
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I have seen that exact same plant in a FB group.
If I remember correctly it was not yet identified 100%. One guess was Jacobea vulgaris (common ragwort). To identify, you can crush the leaves which will have a repulsive odour.

Careful, it is poisonous for some animals.
If it is ragwort indeed, it will bloom in the second year. It is fodder plant for some specialized butterfly caterpillars.
 
pollinator
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I would guess at ragwort as well, invasive and poisonous to livestock (long term liver damage)
 
pollinator
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3rd vote for ragwort, somewhat useful

http://www.english-country-garden.com/flowers/ragwort.htm
 
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