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Sorrel - how to sneak it into meals without people noticing! Ideas needed.

 
pollinator
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I like sorrel. I eat it straight out of the garden, a leaf on a sandwich instead of lettuce, or in a salad with lettuce, and I've eaten it briefly cooked so it's ucky brown but still tasty - to me, as a side-dish.

I know that it's traditionally used in a creamy French soup - but I seem to be lactose intolerant, and cream makes me unhappy.

I do know that you shouldn't eat too much sorrel, because of it's oaxilic acid content, but I have the problem at the moment that the person I cook for won't eat any of it (in hindsight admitting that the ucky looking brown stuff was sorrel was a mistake.) It's not a huge problem, but it's slightly annoying that I have to make separate sorrel forays for myself.

It's growing well in my garden.

I'm looking for "secretly sorrel" recipes! Thanks for any ideas.

 
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I think what I have is French sorrel, and there is no sneaking it anywhere-- it's about as subtle as a kick in the pants. That said, sliced real thin and mixed into a salad, nobody would be able to tell whether the acidity was coming from a dressing or from the leaves. might be similarly useful in any dish you would squeeze lime or lemon juice over.
 
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and there's always soup!
 
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It volunteers as a "weed" in my container garden and I always let it.  I don't eat a lot of it, but a handful goes into every pot of vegetable stock that I make.  (I make a LOT of vegetable stock in my electric pressure cooker, and pressure can the surplus.)  
 
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I've never had "really sorrel but I've eaten the clover looking plant they call sheep sorrel, and the descriptions of the taste sound similar.
To me,  it would be a natural as a tea,  juice or smoothy.
 
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The other day, in attempts to make something that used the stuff we had in abundance, I made a kind of "quish." I have no idea if that's the best term for it, as it was my first time making a savory baked egg dish. Anyway, it went about like this:

  • 9 duck eggs (=12ish chicken eggs)
  • 2+ cups of cheese (we had some Kerrygold Ballyshannon, but cheddar or other cheese would work)
  • 6-8 babbington leek/elephant garlic leaves (chives or onions would work, instead, I'm sure)
  • 2? cups chopped sorrel (I just grabbed a bunch of sorrel and chopped it up. I really should have measured)


  • Preheat oven to 350F. Butter/oil a dish (we used a pyrex casserole dish). Chop up leak/garlic leaves and sorrel and set aside. Mix the eggs and cheese together. Pour a some of egg/cheese mixture on the bottom of the oiled baking dish--just enough to cover the bottom.Then put the chopped leak/sorrel leaves on top of the thin layer of egg/cheese. Then pour the rest of the egg/cheese mix on top. Bake in the oven until it turns golden brown on top.

    It tasted great! We didn't even add salt or pepper, and it didn't taste sour at all. Just yummy! So, maybe try putting the sorrel in egg dishes! Or cooking it with onions.  Sorry my "recipe" is so inexact. I really should have measured when I was making it, but I was just trying to get some food made while doing all the other stuff moms do!
     
    Nicole Alderman
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    William Bronson wrote:I've never had "really sorrel but I've eaten the clover looking plant they call sheep sorrel, and the descriptions of the taste sound similar.
    To me,  it would be a natural as a tea,  juice or smoothy



    Oh yes! We also throw it in our smoothies. Gives it a nice lemony tang. In fact, I often use it in things that would benefit from a bit of lemon. So, if I'm making a salsa, I put it in there. Or, just pick a bunch of leaves and use them when we make tacos. You could probably treat it like rhubarb, too, and add some honey and make a sweet sauce from it to go on pancakes.  

    French sorrel is a bit less sweet than Oregon sorrel/shamrocks/clover-looking-plant. Sheep sorrel looks a bit different from both of them. It's picture time!

    Oregon Sorrel/Redwood Sorrel (the stuff that looks like clovers/shamrocks) Oregon Oxalis. It's the sweetest of all the sorrels I've had.




    Sheep Sorrel Rumex acetosella--looks like little rockets ships. I think it's a bit sweeter than french sorrel, but not as yummy as the shamrock kind of sorrel.




    French Sorrel/Garden Sorrel Rumex acetosa --more tang in it, sometimes bitter, especially after bolting. But, still good!




    Bloody Sorrel (also called Bloody Dock, as all the Rumex sorrels are in the Dock family) Rumex sanguineus --super pretty, but not much sour flavor...or really much flavor at all. At least not in my plants. Mine's just kind of tough

     
    pollinator
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    Speaking as someone with food intolerances... trying to “hide” ingredients upsets me. I’ve had family members hide onion in meals by chopping it up small. The stomach cramps are a dead giveaway though.
     
    pollinator
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    We both enjoy sorrel particularly as a pesto.  Make a lot and freeze it.  Variety is profusion which is trademarked by Richters in Canada.  It will not bolt, and does really well right on through the summer.  Usually the first edible in Spring in Zone 5.  We recently moved and dug up some and took it a long.  Didn't miss a beat.
     
    pollinator
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    For eating, I prefer French sorrel. It's easy to grow, spreads in clumps slowly, rather than running over everything like wood sorrel. And I don't think that it has the oxalic acid issue that wood sorrel has. On the other hand, wood sorrel and it's other oxalis relatives are everywhere in the SF Bay Area. We ate it as children raw from the rough areas, much to our parents dismay.

    I primarily like it in a pesto, usually spread over some salmon prior to baking. Some amounts are nice added to a salad dressing as well.
     
    pollinator
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    Sheep sorrel is everywhere here, and comes up before anything else in the  spring, so I use a lot of it. Use sorrel wherever you want some acid or lemon taste.

    I've put it in potato leek soup, in mashed potatoes and sprinkled over the top of tomato-based soup where you would usually add a spoonful of sour cream, chopped up along with any other cooked green, replacing some of the lemon in hummus, in olive tapenade, chopped fine and sprinkled over any veg you might put lemon on like broccoli, in dolmades... Lots more I can't think of at the moment.
     
    Vera Stewart
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    Thanks everyone for the ideas!
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