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Perennial Pollinator/Beneficial Plants that won't spread

 
steward
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Location: Northern WI (zone 4)
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Hello permies!  I'm trying to put together a list of potential plants to incorporate in a community garden.  Where each garden plot meets its three neighbors, I want to reserve a little space for some perennial beneficial bug plants.  

So I'd like things that obviously attract pollinators, predatory wasps or the like.  They can't cast too much shade.  They need to stay put (no mints or things that "readily self sow").  I'm in a well drained sandy site with full sun in zone 4.

So far I've found these but I don't have experience with many of them.  So if they don't fit my hopes listed above, please let me know.  And please add to the list for me.  Thanks!

Coneflower
Lavender
Columbine
Shasta daisy
Aster
Liatris (Blazing star)
Butterfly weed
Coreopsis
Penstemon
Agastache
 
Posts: 491
Location: Richwood, West Virginia
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Here's a nice write up on Lupins; apparently they fix nitrogen. The lupin border around the lake in Miss Peregrine's Home for Unusual Children has me hooked.
 
Mike Haasl
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Thanks, I have lupines but wasn't sure if they'd spread too much.  I haven't had them long enough to know if they'll take over.  They tend to seed prolifically and do so however far their dried up flowers will reach.  I'm just not sure if they'll have good germination or now...  I'm open to feedback on them for sure!
 
pollinator
Posts: 406
Location: Vermont, USA
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I do love lupines.  Mind are starting to take off!  I open the pods every fall and spread the seeds around.  The single plants grow larger, but the new ones show up all over.

Let's see:

Coreopsis will slowly grow and cover more territory over time.  Well-behaved about it.  Ditto aster, shasta daisy, butterfly weed, and (I think) agastache.

Columbine self-seeds, but it's SO pretty!

Liatris spreads both underground and by seed.  In year three, you'll have so many!  Share with friends!  Start a new garden!
 
Anne Pratt
pollinator
Posts: 406
Location: Vermont, USA
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Oh, suggestions!

Delphineum are well-behaved for me.  Better to get a smaller variety; there's a very pretty one similar to the original wildflower - Delphineum Summer Nights.

https://gracefulgardens.com/delphinium-summer-nights

Painted Daisy has also been quite conservative in my garden, but what great colors!

Primrose and gerbera daisies have never spread around for me.  Also chrysanthemums, come to think of it, and they repel pests!
 
Posts: 27
Location: New Brunswick, Canada
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Consider Hyssop. I started some last year from seed (Hyssopus Officinalis, not anise hyssop)and was impressed at the long flowering period and the diversity of insects that visited it. Cold hardy as well which was important to me. The Internet says it does spread but I have not noticed any runners leave the base plant yet.
 
Mike Haasl
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I grew some last year Glenn and I'm curious to see if they sprout up everywhere or not.  The butterflies and bees loved them.  I'm just not sure if they self sow easily or not.  Now it's on the list
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