• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • r ranson
  • Anne Miller
  • Pearl Sutton
  • Mike Haasl
stewards:
  • paul wheaton
  • Joylynn Hardesty
  • Dave Burton
master gardeners:
  • jordan barton
  • Greg Martin
  • Steve Thorn
gardeners:
  • Carla Burke
  • Jay Angler
  • Kate Downham

Converting an old garage into a oyster mushroom production facility

 
Posts: 9
1
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hello, I am interested in starting a small-scale oyster mushroom production as a first source of income on my farm that I inhereted. I plan to convert an old garage into my first grow and incubation room and start from there. I'veĀ  spent a lot of time researching and now I have lots and lots of questions. I'll try updating this thread as I progress so that everyone interested can learn the process along with me.

The first question I have is: is it a good idea to use the same object for incubation and grow room?

The garage dimensions are 553x310x192-268 cm (cca 18x10x6-8.8 feet). My idea was to split it in two and make one half a greenhouse for fruiting, and use the rest for incubation. I plan to grow in buckets and stack them and make the greenhouse frame out of wood. Also, I plan to fill all the holes and isolate everything.

What would be the best way of making the division? In other words, how would I shape the grow room in relation to the incubation area? From what I've read, I should aim for a 1:1 ratio. I could just roughly split it in half, souns good enough? Also, what about the gap between the wall? My guess is that I should leave it big enough so that I could clean everything. If the gap between the chamber and the outer wall is too small to reach, that could lead to contamination of the incubating buckets. Is this correct?

I potentially have many more questions, but this should do for now. I'll add some pics of the garage later when I get the chance. Thanks in advance for any help.
20200428_122838.jpg
[Thumbnail for 20200428_122838.jpg]
20200428_122750.jpg
[Thumbnail for 20200428_122750.jpg]
 
pollinator
Posts: 240
33
homeschooling kids cat dog books urban
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Not to sound negative, but I see something you might need to address. That's an old garage that has clearly seen some moisture issues. Your first concern might be existing fungi in that space which could compete and interfere with your mushrooms.
 
Albert Cross
Posts: 9
1
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Don't worry about sounding negative, that sounds like a real issue that needs addressing! So how do I address the issue, fungicide before starting anything? Is it safe to use?

The plan is to cover all walls and the ceiling with, as well do the floor. I hoped that might prove enough if I disinfect the area. I guess the spores are the biggest issue. Is there a reliable solution, other than using a relatively new object?
 
gardener
Posts: 3641
Location: latitude 47 N.W. montana zone 6A
979
cat pig rocket stoves
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi Albert; Welcome to Permies!
I'm afraid I know nothing about spores and how to eradicate them. So any suggestions I make should be taken with a big grain of salt .... I could be full of it!

Clean your garage. Start with the rafters and end on the floor!
You might even use a pressure washer. Maybe compressed air to blow it out to start.
Sealing the concrete floor and using plastic walls might be enough in conjunction with the cleaning.
As far as fungicides,  only use organic / natural methods.
If they do not work, build a new shed outside for shroom growing.
Then store your freezer and lawn mower in the garage.
 
Chris Watson
pollinator
Posts: 240
33
homeschooling kids cat dog books urban
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

thomas rubino wrote:Hi Albert; Welcome to Permies!
I'm afraid I know nothing about spores and how to eradicate them. So any suggestions I make should be taken with a big grain of salt .... I could be full of it!

Clean your garage. Start with the rafters and end on the floor!
You might even use a pressure washer. Maybe compressed air to blow it out to start.
Sealing the concrete floor and using plastic walls might be enough in conjunction with the cleaning.
As far as fungicides,  only use organic / natural methods.
If they do not work, build a new shed outside for shroom growing.
Then store your freezer and lawn mower in the garage.



Even after all that, spores from those old, wooden rafters might fall occasionally. I think a simple cover during the innocculation of your grow medium would probably be enough protection. Something along the lines of a restaurant sneeze-guard. You can probably make something adequate out of old wood and a plastic dropcloth.
d1d9246cfab515acf38159e948e97f9f.jpg
[Thumbnail for d1d9246cfab515acf38159e948e97f9f.jpg]
 
Albert Cross
Posts: 9
1
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I tried to say above that the plan is to insulate the roof with styrofoam and tyvek, with tyvek covering the rafters, but somehow I forgot to finish the sentence. Would tyvek, being breathable, let the spores through, or is it good enough? I guess I can easily get another layer of plastic instead of tyvek or along with it. I'd have to review that with my contractor.
gift
 
Rocket Mass Heater Manual
will be released to subscribers in: soon!
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic