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Fruit Harvest Chart

 
pollinator
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I've had a really hard time finding this information so I thought I'd reach out to the community and ask. Are there any charts, graphs, etc showing the fruit tree yields for various types of fruit for the first 10 years? Most nurseries post estimated average values but there's no indication for how long it takes to reach that. I'm trying to plot a chart that shows the ramp up in fruit production over the initial 10 years of growth.
 
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That is hard information to find. What I personally found was more generalized.

Tree size is probably from the root stock graph. Smaller size will produce quicker. Pruning, particularly substantial pruning will delay the start of fruiting. Careful spring and summer pruning can stunt growth and but could advance fruit buds. However no pruning produces the heaviest crops over the first 5 years according to the Utah state agriculture extension.

Basically a specific tree such as a gala apple can come in different sizes. Size coming from the root stock but also much of the trees immunity. The bigger the tree the smaller the early harvest but later it will produce more. Also big trees live longer generally.

The book “designing and maintaining your edible landscape naturally” by Robert Kourik is really great and gave me most of this but searching the internet for a given type of tree and the various types of rootstocks will help.

 
pollinator
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If you have a reasonably priced source for your trees, you could take the following approach.
Plant more than you think you could ever need.
While they are young and small the production per tree will also be small.
As they grow and start to get in each others way the production per tree should also grow.
Then you can decide which trees you like better and thin the herd by cutting out the ones you don't like as well.
This is assuming you have the space to plant multiple trees.
 
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Not exactly the answer, but this outline from Stark Brothers

https://www.starkbros.com/growing-guide/article/how-many-years

gives when trees begin producing (note that the duration is from receiving from Stark not age of tree). This, at least, can help with an estimate. Eg: Apple trees produce in "2-5 years" while pawpaws in "5-7 years". I would estimate use this to estimate the years with no production, assume reduced production in the range provided, and assume the projected mature production after.
 
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LOCATION LOCATION LOCATION.  This plays a huge part on how well fruit trees would grow to produce.  Location is a big factor.  Next up is spacing.  Some trees require a mix of female to males to be highly productive.  Next up is SOIL SOIL SOIL.  Each type of fruit tree tends love a different Ph in the SOIL and the right nutrients.  

So, finding a chart with general info is really the best thing to go by.  It weeds out all of the variables.
 
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Apples (page 7):
http://ses.wsu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/TB35.pdf

Peaches (Page 14)
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/pdffiles/FE/FE101600.pdf

Pears (Page 33):
https://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/downloads/kp78gg85d

If you want another kind of fruit, just ask Google the following:

economics of starting a [TYPE OF FRUIT] orchard filetype:pdf
 
Chris Holcombe
pollinator
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Yeah those economic planning studies are pretty close to what I’m looking for. I realize there’s a ton of factors that makes those numbers wildly speculative but I’d like a starting point. :-)
 
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Judielaine had it part right, Stark Bros offers alot of good general info on their products... I recently did a similar search and came up with https://www.starkbros.com/growing-guide/article/estimated-yield-for-fruit-trees  which I then followed with a search for weights of various bushels and got this result http://www.ilga.gov/commission/jcar/admincode/008/00800600ZZ9998bR.html    The info is out there if you search the right terms. I hope this helps.
 
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