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Which positive changes are you making as a result of the current crisis?

 
Posts: 20
Location: Castro, Chile
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Hi all,

I'm still quite new to these forums so I hope this post is appropriate here.

We hear a lot about how quarantine is difficult, and many things about it ARE difficult.

I'm wondering how the quiet time is something from which I can BENEFIT.

For example, I'm finding that after a lifetime of food practices that were chaotic and wasteful, I'm finding it easy to stock up on nutritious food, put it up in the freezer as needed, focus on shelf-stable staples. I don't eat much wheat or refined sugar, but it's certainly easy to find beans and lentils where I am, even the precooked variety should we lose power or running water. Canned fish, local cheap-but-longlasting foods like piƱones (pine cone fruit, essentially) ... these are all high on the shopping list. I'm also looking into lacto-fermentation since it's easy to get veggies and fruits right now.

And I can think about the kinds of things I want to do after we are through the worst of this.  Offgrid living and growing as much of my own food are high on the list, as is finding a community of people who practice permaculture  and sustainable living.

If you're doing anything new, or just thinking about doing it, I'd love to hear about it!
 
steward & bricolagier
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An excellent topic Amy! Glad you have found your way here :)  
This is a good place for it, and I also added it to our "productive downtime" forum where we have a lot of neat ideas of things to do when things are slow in the rest of your life for any reason.

Personally, I think the most positive thing I'm doing is getting my neighbors to garden (or garden again) sharing seeds, plants, and the services of my tractor to open up planting areas. I'm running amok in the yard of the rental I'm living in, "how much food can I plant here?!" and outsourcing some of it to neighbors with space, One lady said she didn't have much time to do maintenance, as she has raised beds she plants every year that take her time, so we opened a chunk of her yard up with my tractor, and are putting in things like melons and winter squash, mulching it heavily. Won't add much work to her, and will produce a LOT. That makes it so I don't have to plant as many squash as I feel the need to, and can use my space better.

I have already heard "Walmart is out of seeds!" and my reply to that is "let's see, zucchini, green beans, tomatoes, what else would you like?" Seed hoarding is paying off :D They don't know it yet, but later we'll be discussing saving their seed for next year. One bite at a time....

So what I am doing that is positive? Infecting brains and making this area more resilient :) And violating the warranty on this rental with my tractor :D
Which ain't easy, it's a small yard, I almost took out a window with the bucket one day, I was watching the blade... :D




Edit:: Oh, and what I'm doing to the front yard has it's own thread... Yes, you may

 
Posts: 69
Location: Montana
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Amy, congratulations on making excellent use of your time and circumstances!

If you're doing anything new, or just thinking about doing it, I'd love to hear about it!



I'm enjoying doing many things... small steps forward every day, and an occasional big one. Here's a few examples:

My work involves frequent travel. The current situation gifted me more continuous weeks at home than I've had in years. What an opportunity - more time with my wife and family! I'm also fortunate that some of my work can and does continue remotely. I'm using this opportunity to help my clients see how effective we can be remotely, with intention to maintain more remote work and reduce travel frequency even after the current situation passes.

I recently reassessed my goals, celebrated those I completed over the last few months, and narrowed my focus on what I want to accomplish in the next few months.

Garden things: It's planting time in Montana! I have onion sets overdue to plant outside, and I hope to complete that this week. I'm also starting seedlings, and cloning others from cuttings, to be ready to transplant in 4-6 weeks. My microgreens growing system spent the last year starved for attention, so I'm restarting it... cilantro, sunflower, yum!

Food things: I enjoy buying eggs and mushrooms from fantastic local vendors. Despite the current challenges, my wife has been able to arrange delivery or pickup of those items, to continue our support for local vendors and our enjoyment of their excellent products. My wife is also working with our teenage children to shift our meal planning in better and better directions.

Future things: I've been on a long quest for a piece of land suitable for the next steps in my life. I found it in January, and we closed the deal remotely this week. I'm working on a permaculture design for that property. It's four hours away, and there are many things I can't do without traveling there (make an accurate contour map for example), but there are so many things involved in good design that I can do.

Family things: I've used zoom to setup conversations with family members around the world, play games together, and simply connect. I suppose there's no reason I couldn't have done this before, but somehow the current circumstances gave me a poke to do it.


I guess that was more than "a few" examples.

The essence of that list in my mind is that I'm consciously engaging myself in things every day to move forward. This is productive, and it's also protective from the anxiety pandemic that's raging around us. I notice that anxiety pandemic is far more contagious than the medical pandemic.

Life is wonderful, even when I find speed bumps.
So many opportunities, so much to do and enjoy, so much joy and learning I can share.


 
Posts: 70
Location: Southwestern Ohio
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I'm back to working full time on-site (gotta love being essential) but my family is continuing to cook more than they ever had in my whole life now. Our garden is still looking a bit rough, but I'll plant the warmer weather stuff here soon so it should look more populated. when i was home all day i started doing push-ups every day, not that I could do very many at the beginning. I worked on putting a computer together for my friend so we could play together even when we can't see each other -- still need to put some finishing touches on it and sanitize it. I've been working on cleaning out some old 'things' too, but it hasn't been going too well because I'm pretty attached to items. going to get rid of most of my old textbooks though, and look to digitize my papers with google docs.
 
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Pearl Sutton wrote:
I have already heard "Walmart is out of seeds!" and my reply to that is "let's see, zucchini, green beans, tomatoes, what else would you like?" Seed hoarding is paying off They don't know it yet, but later we'll be discussing saving their seed for next year. One bite at a time....



Yes!!! I'm doing the same thing, as well as sharing excess seedlings I potted up and don't have room for in the garden bed.
One of my goals/small projects is to develop a small seed library to further develop strains of varieties which are well adapted to this region. Whenever I give people seeds/plants, most offer to pay me for them; however I've been explaining the seed library, and tell them I would appreciate it if they'll try to save seeds from the things that thrive in the garden and share those with me after the crop is done. Most have enthusiastically agreed so, hopefully, I will be able to get a good foundation of seeds built up for next year.
If not, I will still save my own seeds, and I still have enough hoarded to produce my family's food for many years, so I don't mind just giving them away if it might help feed the person and their family, along with getting them to grow more food.
 
Let's go to the waterfront with this tiny ad:
the permaculture bootcamp in winter
https://permies.com/t/149839/permaculture-projects/permaculture-bootcamp-winter
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