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Chittem for hugelculture?

 
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Is there any reason not to use Chittem for hugelculture? I did some tree clearing this past weekend and REALLY don't care for the smell of the Chittem firewood. I'm thinking I'll use it for a small hugelculture in the garden instead, since I wanted wood for that anyway. Is it safe to assume that the laxative thing won't be an issue for this type of use?

This is my first one so any input is appreciated. Thanks!!
 
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I am not familiar with chittem, but I assume it breaks down over time. The mushrooms that munch on it have been for a while and are okay with the laxative. Perhaps they say 'mmmm laxative that's the good stuff' 😀

Okay enough with the jokes. If you are making a small hugel, it does not take too much labor, so I would try it. This assumes you have space for it.
 
Justin Gerardot
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It seems that nobody has given a helpful response. Perhaps if I bump this post somebody will.

Sonja, have you decided to go forward with this experiment?

I have built a few small hugel beds this spring by hand and have really enjoyed it. I guess I like using a shovel. Who needs a gym membership?
 
Sonja Draven
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Thank you, Justin! That's so sweet.

In my experience, when people don't respond here within a day or two, they just don't know. People are very helpful otherwise. Or just nice. ;)

Yes, I'm going forward with the experiment. And yes, I'm going to hand dig / build. Good full body workout, for sure.
 
Justin Gerardot
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Here are my beds. I'm hoping to get to 6' on the tall one in the back
20200415_174604.jpg
[Thumbnail for 20200415_174604.jpg]
 
Sonja Draven
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Lovely! Your climate looks a lot drier than mine. More sifty dirt, so to speak. I have lots of clay and "weeds" to battle in most areas.

What all are you hoping to grow?
 
Justin Gerardot
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Yes I am likely drier than you, but I get plenty of precipitation. This is based on one year of living here. A quick Google search said an average of 36" of rain. I would bet we had more last year. One storm dropped 8-12" over several counties along the coast of lake Michigan. I agree the photo makes it look very dry.

My sandy dirt is easy to dig once I pass the thick sod. I hope I find clay, but am glad I'm not finding it in my hugel patch.

I have ordered a large amount of seeds, garden vegetables as well as trees and shrubs. I'll post pictures when I get better Internet. Don't want to type them all out.
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