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'lasagne gardening' with composted manure

 
Posts: 22
Location: Fergus, Ontario, Canada
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I inherited a beautifully designed but desperately weedy 1500 sq ft spiral veg bed.  I've pulled the worst offenders (goldenrod, thistle, queen anne's lace, etc) but the soil is thick with crab grass.  I have also inherited a giant pile of well composted manure of unknown origin, and a couple of hay bales.  Based in previous gardening experience (using veg compost) and a bunch of youtube videos, I layered 4-6" of composted manure right over the weedy beds, and now I'm covering that with wet newpaper and a thick mulch of straw.  

But, in reading more, I am now worried that the manure is going to burn my plants (it's spring instead of fall, and we will start planiting the early stuff like peas and lettuce in within the next few weeks).  I will say that the accounts of horrendous plant burning tend to come from more "conventional sources".

My questions:  
-has anyone had success planting straight into well-mulched composted manure?
-if no, is there something I can add to the layer I put down that will balance it out enough to plant into it?  

Thanks folks... hoping to make do with what we have laying around here this year...
 
pollinator
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Pull the mulch back, and make a pocket, fill with a generous amount of soil. Plant into soil so the plants have some time till they get to the manure. Should ease the shock. I wouldnt advise planting directly into manure, even if it is composted.
 
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Location: Missouri
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I renovated my husband's lawn into a very successful vegetable garden last year, using just layers of cardboard over the grass and a 6" layer of old compost on top of that. The compost consists of horse manure and bedding from a local horse barn, which has rotted/decayed/broken down for about two years. While the compost is a bit weedy and needs some regular weeding, I haven't had any trouble with plants being "burnt". On the contrary, they look amazing and produced exceptionally well last year.
 
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I have planted straight into compost using no soil. So if it is well composted then there will not be a problem in my opinion.  Like Travis said "Pull the mulch back, and make a pocket, fill with a generous amount of soil."
 
Ida Schwartz
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Location: Fergus, Ontario, Canada
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Annie Marsh wrote:I renovated my husband's lawn into a very successful vegetable garden last year, using just layers of cardboard over the grass and a 6" layer of old compost on top of that. The compost consists of horse manure and bedding from a local horse barn, which has rotted/decayed/broken down for about two years. While the compost is a bit weedy and needs some regular weeding, I haven't had any trouble with plants being "burnt". On the contrary, they look amazing and produced exceptionally well last year.



Annie Marsh, did you plant directly into the composted manure?  This is very old manure, there is not sign of any poop in there and it smells like soil.  Did you find you got a good yield on the flower plants?  The other thing I've read is that you will get lots of beautiful foliage but less fruit.

I'm tempted to do an experiment, do a few direct plantings and then some with soil pockets, and see what happens...

gift
 
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