• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Anne Miller
  • Pearl Sutton
  • Nicole Alderman
stewards:
  • Mike Haasl
  • r ranson
  • paul wheaton
master gardeners:
  • jordan barton
  • John F Dean
  • Rob Lineberger
  • Carla Burke
  • Jay Angler
gardeners:
  • Greg Martin
  • Ash Jackson
  • Jordan Holland

Peacock Meat

 
Posts: 59
1
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi Meredith:

Welcome to our community.  

There is a piece of property down the road from us that has over 40 peafowl who have multiplied over the years and they don't belong to anyone.

Animal control has been ordered to shoot them due to their noise in the spring and they say it is  "public health issue."

Some landowners don't want them to be killed.

I was thinking that if I were to capture them, I could have them butchered and offer them to local families who are out of work because of the Coronavirus.

So I have a few questions:

1. Is this ethical?
2. DO you have any idea how peafowl meat tastes?  I hear it was a delicacy in Ancient Greece and Rome.

Thank you!

Paul
 
gardener
Posts: 1802
Location: South of Capricorn
703
dog rabbit urban cooking writing homestead ungarbage
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
You might find this interesting. https://foragerchef.com/cooking-a-peacock/

As for ethical-- I think if they are "doomed" to be shot by animal control anyway, why not use them for some good instead of just letting them rot where they fall? But unless people in your area are used to eating game birds, it might be hard to convince them to try something new and you may end up eating them all yourself.
 
pollinator
Posts: 1981
Location: La Palma (Canary island) Zone 11
purity forest garden tiny house wofati bike solar
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Ethics are more personal. The question I see here: is it legal?

Ethics of meat of me is more about the way to raise them, and the global cultural way we have created, because it mostly implies that food production does not have to be ethical but just legal! And ethics vary, as we can see that some people want to force others to eat only plants, even though some people cannot.
 
gardener & hugelmaster
Posts: 2007
Location: mountains of Tennessee
796
cattle hugelkultur cat dog trees hunting chicken bee homestead ungarbage
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I have heard the meat is very tasty but have no first hand experience with it. I would like to try it though.

I think it is unethical to kill them without eating them, especially in this uncertain time.
 
Pavel Mikoloski
Posts: 59
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

You bring up some great points.  You're right.  Just shooting them without using the meat seems like a travesty.

I wonder, though if there might be some pushback from members of the community about eating something so beautiful.

I guess no matter what you do, we are going to upset someone!

Paul
 
Mike Barkley
gardener & hugelmaster
Posts: 2007
Location: mountains of Tennessee
796
cattle hugelkultur cat dog trees hunting chicken bee homestead ungarbage
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
According to the original post animal control has been ordered to kill them. Zero waste is one of the permaculture fundamentals.

Starvation seems like a public health issue. Lots of animals are "beautiful" but people eat them all the time. I would tell those who would prefer it just be wasted to get over it. Just because it's not wrapped in plastic doesn't mean it's not good food. I think it's time to think outside the styrofoam box a bit!
 
pollinator
Posts: 120
Location: North Idaho
59
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
If the peafowl can be captured one might consider "selling" them.  Peafowl command quite a price, when you can find them for sale....  $400 to $500 a mated set is not an uncommon price.  Just buying chicks can run you $20 to $25 a chick...

Some day I would like to get into peafowl, but for now the price is too much and with four teens still at home, I have my hands full enough with them at moment.
 
Pavel Mikoloski
Posts: 59
1
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi Roy:

Yes I thought if that because I know how to catch them.  The problem is keeping so many of them - you need a good pen in order to do that.

Maybe I can ask around.

P.

Mike:  Lol!
 
Slime does not pay. Always keep your tiny ad dry.
Greenhouse of the Future ebook - now free for a while
https://permies.com/goodies/greenhouse
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic